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    Default Chances of wrecking a motorcycle

    I love to ride but I always have that fear in the back of my head of wrecking. I was just curious to see how many people wrecked before and how long you have been riding. If you ride for let's say 25 years, what do you think the chances of eventually wrecking is? I know that there are many ways to get hurt or die throughout the day, but how risky is riding? I am definetely a safe rider IMO and always ride like I am invisible. I am more scared of the other crazy people on the rode than I am of my riding skills.

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    Default ridin time

    I've been riding 45 years (ouch-must be gettin old)-been in 2 wrecks. You gotta watch other people comin outa everywhere. like you said-don't worry about you iys the other crazies

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    Senior Member Roads2Ride's Avatar
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    Default 35 years +, all good.

    35+ years of riding, and never been down. I've come close, but it was when I was doing something I shouldn't, or just not being careful. Ride defensively, assume the other guy doesn't see you, watch for road hazards, avoid riding at night (when possible), avoid rain/snow/ice, stay out of other driver's blind spots, and keep your bike, brakes and tires in good working order.

    Most accidents are caused by other drivers who claim "I never saw him" and pulled out in front of you from a side street or parking lot exit. Whenever you're on a two-laned road, ride in the center-most lane away from cars entering the roadway. When approaching a car that is entering the roadway, slow down and assume that they will pull out in front of you. If they do, your speed is already reduced and you should be able to stop. Intersections are notorious also. Slow down, look left and right and when you're sure no one is going to run the light and broadside you, crank the throttle and get across the intersection quickly.

    When on the highway, keep the most distance possible between you and other cars. Keep an eye out for on-ramps and merging traffic and assume they don't see you. Keep your headlight ON and if you have auxiliary lighting (light bar) keep those on too.

    When stopped at a red light and a car is in front of you, keep 6 feet between you and the car in front of you. The space in front of you is for getting out of the way if a car comes up fast behind you and is about to rear-end you. ALWAYS leave yourself an exit to avoid what's in front of you or to get away from what's either beside you or coming up behind you.

    Say a prayer every day. The rest is out of your control.
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    Senior Member Biodude's Avatar
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    unfortunately the odds are stacked against us.
    lurking

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    Senior Member Beermand's Avatar
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    I have been riding for 43 years and other than stupid stuff on a dirtbike as a kid, I have never been down. "Knock on wood" and by the grace of God!
    My uncle was killed on my Dad's bike bike when I was a kid so well aware of the risks. Just drive defensively, never drink and drive, maintain your bike properly, and it doesn't hurt to say a little prayer every time you get on the bike.
    03 VTX 1800S Illusion Blue Ultimate X Big Boy GYTT 205/65-15 Darkside and Loving it!


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    Unfortunately in my younger days I was the poster child for riding beyond my limits.

    I went 25 years without a bike and then bought this 1800. I thought that between being older and buying a cruiser I would have cooled my jets some. But I've come to realize that idiocy knows no age limit.

    I have to watch myself constantly to not get bigger than my britches. What I have found helpful is occasionally watching some of the MC horror movies on youtube. Watching some of these tragic incidents and reminding myself that in the event of an accident my knees and elbows become the bumpers and crumple zones slaps me with a healthy reality check.

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    aside from dumping my 3yr old son over the handlebars of my hardley 27 years ago, right in my driveway, and in front of the wife (the front brake shoe came apart), I've only had incidents on the trails.

    Although unhurt, it pretty much freaked the kid out.

    wifey was a little

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beermand View Post
    My uncle was killed on my Dad's bike bike when I was a kid so well aware of the risks.
    Not to go off topic or anything, but that is why I don't let others ride my bike. If they ride the same/similar bike then possibly, but I couldn't deal with something like that on my conscience if something were to happen on my bike. I'd feel responsible.
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    Senior Member dezzy7's Avatar
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    There were 6.7 million motorcycle on the road in 2006 and 4,837 fatal accidents and there were 104,000 motorcycle accidents including parking lot spills.

    28% of those fatalities consisted of above 0.08 Blood Alcohol
    41% of those fatalities were single rider riders hitting a stationary object
    27% of those fatalities were speeding excessively

    With all that said riding appears to be pretty safe if you don't drink and drive, speed excessively, and ride within your skill limitations?

    First mini-bike ride at about 10 or 11 now close enough to 50 that the AARP mailings start getting opened

    Accidents 1.... I was practicing a burnout and lost it, and wouldn't you know the girl in high school I most wanted to get with had to be watching ....sometimes life sucks

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    Quote Originally Posted by 19COBRA93 View Post
    Not to go off topic or anything, but that is why I don't let others ride my bike. If they ride the same/similar bike then possibly, but I couldn't deal with something like that on my conscience if something were to happen on my bike. I'd feel responsible.
    Yes, my Uncle was a skilled rider and had ridden my Dad had 2 Triumph 750's. A truck cane into his lane and hit him head on. Shows we don't always have control no matter how well or safe we ride. My Dad never rode again for years until I was about 23 and brought my GS650 down to help him start his own business in Branson. I would get up in the morning to go to the shop and he had already left and stole my keys and took my bike to work leaving me the old pickup truck to drive in. I got a real kick out of it because he started me riding when I was 4 years old and he had not ridden since my Uncles death. I enjoyed giving him that pleasure of riding again, he rode my bike almost everyday while I was there.
    03 VTX 1800S Illusion Blue Ultimate X Big Boy GYTT 205/65-15 Darkside and Loving it!


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    All I know is that I have only been riding 2 years now and the more I ride the safer I try to be. I am not riding so fast any more plus always try not to ride at night unless it is a short commute and I have to. Like others said, say a prayer, ride within your skill limits, don't drink and ride like you are invisible. Good luck to all who ride and let's keep the statistics on the low end.

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    Senior Member vcruiser03's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dezzy7 View Post
    There were 6.7 million motorcycle on the road in 2006 and 4,837 fatal accidents and there were 104,000 motorcycle accidents including parking lot spills.

    28% of those fatalities consisted of above 0.08 Blood Alcohol
    41% of those fatalities were single rider riders hitting a stationary object
    27% of those fatalities were speeding excessively

    With all that said riding appears to be pretty safe if you don't drink and drive, speed excessively, and ride within your skill limitations?

    First mini-bike ride at about 10 or 11 now close enough to 50 that the AARP mailings start getting opened

    Accidents 1.... I was practicing a burnout and lost it, and wouldn't you know the girl in high school I most wanted to get with had to be watching ....sometimes life sucks
    i agree 100%
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roads2Ride View Post
    35+ years of riding, and never been down. I've come close, but it was when I was doing something I shouldn't, or just not being careful. Ride defensively, assume the other guy doesn't see you, watch for road hazards, avoid riding at night (when possible), avoid rain/snow/ice, stay out of other driver's blind spots, and keep your bike, brakes and tires in good working order.

    Most accidents are caused by other drivers who claim "I never saw him" and pulled out in front of you from a side street or parking lot exit. Whenever you're on a two-laned road, ride in the center-most lane away from cars entering the roadway. When approaching a car that is entering the roadway, slow down and assume that they will pull out in front of you. If they do, your speed is already reduced and you should be able to stop. Intersections are notorious also. Slow down, look left and right and when you're sure no one is going to run the light and broadside you, crank the throttle and get across the intersection quickly.

    When on the highway, keep the most distance possible between you and other cars. Keep an eye out for on-ramps and merging traffic and assume they don't see you. Keep your headlight ON and if you have auxiliary lighting (light bar) keep those on too.

    When stopped at a red light and a car is in front of you, keep 6 feet between you and the car in front of you. The space in front of you is for getting out of the way if a car comes up fast behind you and is about to rear-end you. ALWAYS leave yourself an exit to avoid what's in front of you or to get away from what's either beside you or coming up behind you.

    Say a prayer every day. The rest is out of your control.
    Excellent post.

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    Senior Member Frank in GA's Avatar
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    It really doesn't matter how long we have been riding when you come to think of it because, Cell phones haven't been around as long as most of us have been riding. Too drivers education used to nearly be a mandatory thing in school. I personally know of people who have failed their drivers test because they got a text message they had to answer while taking the test.

    As stated previously the odds are stacked against us, the trick is learning where and when to ride the scoot and when to take the cage instead.

    JMHO
    '02 1800C Illusion Blue

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    Senior Member oasysco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hudispit View Post
    I love to ride but I always have that fear in the back of my head of wrecking. I was just curious to see how many people wrecked before and how long you have been riding. If you ride for let's say 25 years, what do you think the chances of eventually wrecking is? I know that there are many ways to get hurt or die throughout the day, but how risky is riding? I am definetely a safe rider IMO and always ride like I am invisible. I am more scared of the other crazy people on the rode than I am of my riding skills.
    Some people ascribe to the saying "there are two types of motorcyclists: those who have crashed and those who will".

    I don't buy that. There's no reason except for bad luck that would ever be true.

    That said, I wrecked my bike the first day I had it in 1974. I didn't get hurt at all. Since then I've not wrecked, but I have dropped my bike by not putting the kickstand down all the way or putting it down in dirt.

    Anyway, the vast majority of wrecks are not fatal.

    55yo and older is a red flag for ins companies as some require MSF classes for discounts every 2 years. Less than 25yo is another red flag.

    Sport bikes can cost more to insure than cruisers. Bigger CC bikes cost more to insure than lower CC bikes.

    So what are yuor chances? I'm willing to bet that ins companies have figured that out for each age group, but I don't nkow what it is.
    Greg in SE Virginia
    2000 Harley UC
    Gone, but not forgotten: VTX1300S, VTX1800C, Aero 750 (couch on wheels)

  17. #16
    Senior Member aardvark's Avatar
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    Accidents are generally caused by one of two things...
    1. an unsafe act
    2. an unsafe condition

    You have control, only in part,of the first one...
    You cant prevent an unsafe act performed by someone else,only yourself...
    The odds of an unsafe condition,such as road hazards,weather,etc..,combined with unsafe acts of others,
    does put us at a bit of a high risk....
    Drive defensively,and dont take foolish chances,and you may never have a
    mishap.....


    2002 1800 RETRO SPOKE ILLUSION BLUE, SOLD May 2014
    Bought 2011 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic June 2014

  18. #17
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    Check out this link to the Insurance Information Institute

    http://www.iii.org/media/hottopics/i...ce/motorcycle/

    It will give you a wealth of information on statistics, as well as accidents/fatalities by age, bike, etc. It also gives you the helmet laws for each state.

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    Not counting dirt bikes (I crash that all the time) my crash history is:

    Started riding on the street in 1980 ( I was 14).

    Lowsided on some chipseal in '86
    Rearended at a stoplight in '87
    T-boned a car in '88

    The T-bone was a wake up call and I started operating more carefully. Didn't really slow down, but just started being more away of my surroundings (I should have avoided all 3 of those crashes). Since then I've been crash free (Knock on wood).

    I think we go through stages when we start riding. The first year or so we are pretty carefull as we are still uncomfortable with the whole thing. Then as we bocome more skilled we get over confident, this is the dangerous time. Some survive it, some give up. After that period we start thinking more and therfore are safer. OF course this doesn't apply to everyone
    Never put your motorcycle where your brain hasn't already been.

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    Senior Member Blade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roads2Ride View Post
    35+ years of riding, and never been down. I've come close, but it was when I was doing something I shouldn't, or just not being careful. Ride defensively, assume the other guy doesn't see you, watch for road hazards, avoid riding at night (when possible), avoid rain/snow/ice, stay out of other driver's blind spots, and keep your bike, brakes and tires in good working order.

    Most accidents are caused by other drivers who claim "I never saw him" and pulled out in front of you from a side street or parking lot exit. Whenever you're on a two-laned road, ride in the center-most lane away from cars entering the roadway. When approaching a car that is entering the roadway, slow down and assume that they will pull out in front of you. If they do, your speed is already reduced and you should be able to stop. Intersections are notorious also. Slow down, look left and right and when you're sure no one is going to run the light and broadside you, crank the throttle and get across the intersection quickly.

    When on the highway, keep the most distance possible between you and other cars. Keep an eye out for on-ramps and merging traffic and assume they don't see you. Keep your headlight ON and if you have auxiliary lighting (light bar) keep those on too.

    When stopped at a red light and a car is in front of you, keep 6 feet between you and the car in front of you. The space in front of you is for getting out of the way if a car comes up fast behind you and is about to rear-end you. ALWAYS leave yourself an exit to avoid what's in front of you or to get away from what's either beside you or coming up behind you.

    Say a prayer every day. The rest is out of your control.
    +2!!

    I absolutely and wholeheartedly agree with this perhaps life-saving post. If not committed to memory it definitely bears serious re-reading and obviously remembering and if we were smart we should even place a hard copy of it where we see it at work everyday and in large print near our motorcycles so we are exposed to the tips and their wisdom constantly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hudispit View Post
    I love to ride but I always have that fear in the back of my head of wrecking. I was just curious to see how many people wrecked before and how long you have been riding. If you ride for let's say 25 years, what do you think the chances of eventually wrecking is? I know that there are many ways to get hurt or die throughout the day, but how risky is riding? I am definitely a safe rider IMO and always ride like I am invisible. I am more scared of the other crazy people on the rode than I am of my riding skills.
    I've been riding as long as some of these other guys....long, and by no means am I telling you to stop riding.....but if crashing or getting into a accident is always on your mind maybe it's time to stop riding. Sort of along the same principle as (while turning in a 180) "look down fall down". Or the guy who preplans to "lay his bike down", does instead of taking evasive action etc.
    Just a thought. Be safe!
    M STAR KMA

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    Senior Member Blade's Avatar
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    Mark's reply above is very "Zen" and rings true with some amount of accuracy. You really may want to think about wrecking, less. Riding your scoot is supposed to be stress-relieving, not stress-inducing. Remember that old adage: "Don't wish for something, you just may get it"....

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    28 years of riding(on the street that is), and been in one accedent and it was because someone pulled out of a drive way and didn't see me. Now I still ride I am just more watchful of my surroundings. When I ride the thought of another wreck is always in the back of my mind, but you have to ignore that thought and ride as safely as posible and have fun while doing it.
    More chrome,ya,ya,more chrome

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    At 53 years old I have been riding for 44 years and no accidents. Now mind you I do not count the days of my youth when riding dirt bikes and hill climbing and crashing. I was always taught to be very defensive. Now I have had some close calls because of the road idiots not seeing me.

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    Down five times:
    Twice put my foot on oil/anti-freeze slicks while stopped.
    Once on a wet ferry deck trying to hold the bike up in high seas.
    Twice hit the marbles at an intersection and pulling out of a drive way
    Black 02 Retro 1800S 43,601 miles
    Dark Red 06 GL1800 22,416 miles
    Riding Hondas since the late 60's
    Born 07/24/42 Grassvalley,Calif.
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    Senior Member xer's Avatar
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    Little off subject but i have read you are more likely to have an accident within the first couple of months of either just starting to ride, or you have ridden for however long and just got a new bike and are just not familiar with it. Personaly i have never had an accident on the street but the quads are a whole different story.
    I YAM WHAT I YAM '02 1800c (Blurple) Vance n Hines Big Shots, PCIII, Mustang seat

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    I rode for 41 years without a mishap, untill 2 years ago. My bike hooked up while doing a second gear burnout, broke my right knee - plateau fracture. I figured it was my own fault. Last July a car turned left on top of me, broke my left knee bad. Shoved my femur 3 inches down through my knee, still recovering from multiple surgeries.
    I refuse to let this scare me and plan on riding untill I die!

  28. #27
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    In 1980, I was riding a Suzuki 400 (can't remember the model, but it was a standard) down a business street and a little old lady shot back out of a diagonal parking spot and I slammed into the side of her car. I didn't ride again until 2003. I dropped my bike the first day I got it, actually at the first stop sign I came to when I left the dealership.

    Since then, I have taken the MSF, and I ride as safely as possible, ready to give the right of way (or avoid) to cars, trucks, buses, planes, submarines, and anything else that could run over me. I worry more about having a blowout than anything.

    My preacher said it best: he was taken to task by the deacons for having an "unsafe and irresponsible" hobby: he rode a Triumph 650. He addressed the congregation as follows:

    "Yes, motorcycles can be dangerous. But so is living. I could live my life, taking no risks whatsoever, and arrive safely at death. Or, I could enjoy my hobby, riding safely and responsibly, and trust in God to keep me safe until it is my appointed time to die. I will continue to ride."

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    Senior Member RoadDawg's Avatar
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    So far I have been riding motorized two wheeled contraptions for over forty years... I have hit pretty much every type of animal that roams Gods Green Earth in this land. The one that made me crash was the deer that just had to jump on the front of my Gold Wing at 55 MPH... That one hurt a bit... Do I believe that we have any control over our safety? Yes we do have some... The BEST way is to always ride with the attitude that you are prepared for anything to happen... This way you stand less of a chance to be surprised when it does happen. Surprise begets panic, panic begets unplanned and often tragic results... As one or more have stated... prayer helps a lot... It really depends greatly on the attitude and preparedness of the rider in concert with that particular riders skill level. Skill levels can only increase with experience and experience comes with practice. To maximize your chances on the road and thereby "have a safe trip". You MUST simply learn all you can from those who have been there done that and practice those skills. THEN remember that YOU can NOT be the loose nut between the riders seat and the handle bars everytime you ride. MANY "accidents" are the result of "Hey... Watch THIS!". Rider Education is NEVER a bad thing.

    Be Safe,

    Darth RoadDawg
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    Senior Member dzuber76's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark_1bx View Post
    I've been riding as long as some of these other guys....long, and by no means am I telling you to stop riding.....but if crashing or getting into a accident is always on your mind maybe it's time to stop riding. Sort of along the same principle as (while turning in a 180) "look down fall down". Or the guy who preplans to "lay his bike down", does instead of taking evasive action etc.
    Just a thought. Be safe!
    I agree with the principle of this, but perhaps I can frame it another way. On any type of bike you are taught to look where you want to go rather than what you're trying to avoid. So instead of looking ahead and thinking about where the wreck might occur, look ahead and see how the wreck can be avoided. I agree with the "Zen-ness" of this as Blade said.

    When I bought the X, I was a part-time rider. Every ride brought that sense of unfamiliar which forced me to remember the MSF training and to keep my head on a swivel. What worries me is that now I am a full-time rider, the X being my only vehicle, and I seem to be getting a little too comfortable on two wheels.

    Did go down (gently) in a lot the other day. Swung around to back into a spot too quickly and lost my balance. Zero damage and when I looked around to see if anyone noticed, no one in sight.
    2006 1300 R

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    Senior Member mojoguy's Avatar
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    Been riding for 32 years on and off road. Been down a few times on the dirtbikes and a few broken bones to prove it. Never been down on the road and I never think about it when I ride.

    1981 CR80R Elsinore
    1994 CR250R
    2007 VTX1800F1

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