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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need advice for changing my clutch. I’ve already removed clutch and have a Barnett Clutch kit on the way.

the sad part of this is that this will be the second attempt at clutch change. I installed a Barnett clutch a month ago. It’s complete gone. When removing it today it was chewed all to hell. I’m not sure what I did wrong. Metal plates were blue and a few friction plates completely gone.

I thought I had done my research last time but clearly did not do something right. Any help would be appreciated. It’s killing me inside to see my bike garaged not working.
 

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Please don't hate me for asking this but you did refill the case with fluid after the first clutch change, right?

If the steel plates were blue and friction plates gone, it seems that the clutch kept on slipping, building up heat and self-destructing.
I assume you set the proper clutch preload and free-play after the job? You don't want the clutch to slip at all when engaged.
 

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Please don't hate me for asking this but you did refill the case with fluid after the first clutch change, right?

If the steel plates were blue and friction plates gone, it seems that the clutch kept on slipping, building up heat and self-destructing.
I assume you set the proper clutch preload and free-play after the job? You don't want the clutch to slip at all when engaged.
The clutch and engine share oil, so if he didn't refill the engine with oil, he would have bigger problems than just the clutch.

Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
 

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That gets to show how ignorant I am about our Hondas. I have not had to do any work on the primary on our bike yet so I went with the (incorrect) assumption that the primary uses its own thick oil bath. Oh well. Disregard.
 

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Yes, you screwed something up upon reassembly. Do you have a SM? Last plate into the stack must be offset. From the description of the damage, your clutch was always (or nearly always) slipping. Once new clutch is assembled, measure the amount of lift (pressure plate movement) and compare to spec. Simple clutch 'test': With engine off and bike in 1st gear, attempt to roll bike forward. It should NOT roll. Now pull in and hold the clutch, bike should roll.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
When it comes to mechanics I am an “inquisitive idiot”…lol.
I did soak the friction plates in clean oil. Ignorant me did not realize that clutch and engine shared oil. Upon reassembly the first time I only added clutch fluid. I did check oil level which read fine.
it sound like I didn’t offset the last plate or check the lift. I only used a torque wrench on each spring bolt. I didn’t have a service manual and followed a few videos on YouTube (mistake??).
 

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Clutch fluid? I hope you are joking. There is only one fill, and it's for engine, transmission, and clutch. I hope you put the proper oil in.

Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Clutch fluid? I hope you are joking. There is only one fill, and it's for engine, transmission, and clutch. I hope you put the proper oil in.

Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
[/QUOTe

I did not put clutch fluid in the engine oil fill. I didn’t realize, however, what you point out. Thanks for the info. Trying to learn this. Im pretty sure my root cause was failure to offset the final friction plate. I learned lots more from SM.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes, you screwed something up upon reassembly. Do you have a SM? Last plate into the stack must be offset. From the description of the damage, your clutch was always (or nearly always) slipping. Once new clutch is assembled, measure the amount of lift (pressure plate movement) and compare to spec. Simple clutch 'test': With engine off and bike in 1st gear, attempt to roll bike forward. It should NOT roll. Now pull in and hold the clutch, bike should roll.
That must have been what I did…not offset last plate. I’ve since got a SM. I understand what I screwed up. Hopefully this time around I’ll get it right.
 

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You'll get it. Don't reuse the blued steel plates, they are lunched. 50 years working on all kinds of engine powered equipment; figure out how it works (what it does) before you mess with it. Once you get it hot (go for a ride) change the oil, as there is bound to be a bunch of crap floating around in there. For 1st run just use some cheap 10w40. Then put whatever you like in it.
 
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Yes, you screwed something up upon reassembly. Do you have a SM? Last plate into the stack must be offset. From the description of the damage, your clutch was always (or nearly always) slipping. Once new clutch is assembled, measure the amount of lift (pressure plate movement) and compare to spec. Simple clutch 'test': With engine off and bike in 1st gear, attempt to roll bike forward. It should NOT roll. Now pull in and hold the clutch, bike should roll.
 

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Once new clutch is assembled, measure the amount of lift (pressure plate movement) and compare to spec. How do you do that?
 

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Well Turnerman, there is more than one way. The method I use is to set a dial indicator on press. plate and zero it out. Than pull the clutch and see what the lift is.
 
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