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^^^ Can't tell you how many times this was the case when I was a programmer.
 

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I used to tell this to my service techs working under me back when I had a real job.
 

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But when your hose is curved and you push it on crooked you lessen your chances.

Spark plug socket and an extension is my choice.
The more curved the tubing is the harder it would be, no doubt (ever). Most fuel line comes curved from the auto parts store because of how it's stored on rolls. Soaking a length in very hot water with an alan wrench inserted into the tube (to keep straight) a few mins helps turn the tubing into a tool. One thing for sure is you cannot strip a plug that way and that's the main thing.

A nice fitting spark plug socket , that holds the plug is all you would need, plus it keeps you out of the Kitchen. To start the threads let only the weight of the plug and socket pressure the plug inwards and gently turn the plug until there is no doubt it's threaded for several turns. If it gives you trouble, try another one of your plugs just to see.

Hop, i feel for you man, stripping a plug is pretty much the worst nightmare in my book, we're talking nervous breakdown stuff (mini o_O).;)😁
 

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Another thing to consider in the future is use anti-seize thread compound. 1 can will easily outlast your bike.
 

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Another thing to consider in the future is use anti-seize thread compound. 1 can will easily outlast your bike.
Many say not to use it for any number of reasons, but I always do. Have yet to regret it. Years ago, I had a Suzuki GS780. Went to change the plugs and totally destroyed the threads getting a plug out. That involved pulling the head for a proper machining operation. What a job! I believe anti-seize would have avoided the issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
UPDATE:

EXTREMELY FRUSTRATED! :mad:

I purchased a Back Tap spark plug re-thread tool (KD Tools) and after carefully following the instructions that came with the tool and the YouTube video, only to learn the tool would not go into the spark plug hole. It simply 'drops' in on the video. I ordered another tool of a different brand (Powerbuilt) back tap and after much effort, managed to get the tool dropped into the cylinder and backed it through the threads easily until it hit the damaged threads.

At this point, I tried finger turning with no success, so I attached a ratchet/deep socket and carefully turned it. It turned a little then BROKE OFF IN THE CYLINDER! :mad: Fortunately, I was able to pull the broken pieces out without them falling into the engine. (((SIGH)))

NOW WHAT????

Bike has been down for two weeks with my waiting for the tools to be delivered so I could try this fix. I guess I need to have the bike towed to a shop and fork over the big bucks this will take to fix.

All this because I was trying to figure out why my bike is suddenly running like crap. This kind of shit is what makes me want to quit riding, I swear.
 
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I follow H & F method, first sign of an issue I stop ! I would rent a trailer (ex, U-Haul) do d&d and get it to a shop that can complete the issue. As fast as I could !
 

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Wow. Hate to hear it. And really surprised too. Figured you’d get it all straightened out fairly easily once the right tools were acquired.

Are you active on any Yammie boards? Is this kind of mishap a comparatively rare unicorn event with their bikes, same as it would be for VTXs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Wow. Hate to hear it. And really surprised too. Figured you’d get it all straightened out fairly easily once the right tools were acquired.

Are you active on any Yammie boards? Is this kind of mishap a comparatively rare unicorn event with their bikes, same as it would be for VTXs?

Yes, I figured it would get all straightened out too. Never guessed the tool would break off inside the plug hole when only putting minimum force on it.

Yes, I'm active on a Yamaha forum and just like this one, it's rare to read about anyone stripping their plugs.

I will likely have to have my VTX towed to a local motorcycle mechanic I trust, but he is typically booked for weeks out. Looks like it might be awhile and some $$ before I'll be riding my VTX again (((sniff))). :(
 

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Sometimes shit happens, and I'm sorry HOP ... been there done that. Well, not that specifically, but I truly understand your frustration. Best of luck moving forward. I have found the same though, sometimes you have to cut your losses and just get the wallet out :(
 

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Hop, there are several if not many on here that have had success with the back-tap tool. Its possible you just had one of those unfortunate 'aw shit' moments. I'm not sure that I wouldn't give it another try with a new back-tap. Would certainly be far cheaper than taking it to a shop. Can't mess it up any more than it already is if they have to pull the head.🤷‍♂️
 
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Sorry to hear this.

When I was doing mine last year, I noticed I hit a spot that was too much, I backed it out (loosened the spreader, and threaded it back into the cylinder void). I realized that to get it to work properly it should have little to no resistance. I did 10-15 passes basically using my hands (no wrench) and it was enough to correct the threads ever so slightly each time. Each time I barely spread it more using my fingers. If I felt too much force, I "backed it out" again.

I think if one's treads are more jacked than that, it would be better to helicoil it than use a back-tap.

I now can thread in a spark plug all the way by hand, and turn it a quarter to half turn to properly torque it down.

When I got the bike the treads in this one spot were crappy, I was so worried that I only changed that plug and never used that one for inspection. Now all 4 threads are perfect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Hop, there are several if not many on here that have had success with the back-tap tool. Its possible you just had one of those unfortunate 'aw shit' moments. I'm not sure that I wouldn't give it another try with a new back-tap. Would certainly be far cheaper than taking it to a shop. Can't mess it up any more than it already is if they have to pull the head.🤷‍♂️
I've already concluded as you have, so I ordered two more back-tap tools. It's possible I got a bad 'lot' so I'll have a few more tools to try it a few more times. If one of these brakes and the pieces fall inside it'll be hell trying to get them out and may force the engine to be taken apart at the shop, verses having them tap the traditional method.
 
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I've already concluded as you have, so I ordered two more back-tap tools. It's possible I got a bad 'lot' so I'll have a few more tools to try it a few more times. If one of these brakes and the pieces fall inside it'll be hell trying to get them out and may force the engine to be taken apart at the shop, verses having them tap the traditional method.
As you found out, they are very hard and brittle. A bad one is a distinct possibility. Should be magnetic if anything does drop inside.

Also, don't be afraid to put some lube on it. I like grease, sticky grease, because it will catch small bits that get cut away. The lube will help it cut as well. Likely you already did that, but just in case ... got my fingers crossed for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
As you found out, they are very hard and brittle. A bad one is a distinct possibility. Should be magnetic if anything does drop inside.

Also, don't be afraid to put some lube on it. I like grease, sticky grease, because it will catch small bits that get cut away. The lube will help it cut as well. Likely you already did that, but just in case ... got my fingers crossed for you.

Thanks for the tip. I used plenty of red stick grease bought just for this job. I have a magnetic tool that will fit inside the plug hole, (telescoping, retractable penlight type) that is made for retrieving items dropped, say in an engine case. I will wrap some strong tape (I have aluminum tape) around the shaft of the tool so if part of it breaks the tape will possible hold it all together, even if broken. UGH!!! I'm developing a phobia now of screwing in spark plugs! :eek:
 

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Thanks for the tip. I used plenty of red stick grease bought just for this job. I have a magnetic tool that will fit inside the plug hole, (telescoping, retractable penlight type) that is made for retrieving items dropped, say in an engine case. I will wrap some strong tape (I have aluminum tape) around the shaft of the tool so if part of it breaks the tape will possible hold it all together, even if broken. UGH!!! I'm developing a phobia now of screwing in spark plugs! :eek:
Lol ... Occupational hazard I suppose. We start to over think. Just use your sense of it, I'm confident you'll be fine.
 
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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
UPDATE: SUCCESS!!! (y)

My first try at using the Back Tap ended in failure, with the tool breaking apart in the plug hole! My 'lesson learned' was to go much slower and only use just barely over finger tightness in torquing the tool, backing off and re-starting many, many times.

There was a lot of aluminum residual stuck to the 'sticky' grease I applied and you can feel it cutting (re-cutting) the aluminum as it backs out. The plug went back in smoothly and I made sure to use anti-seize. The bike started up fine and I ran it up and down the block with no issues at all. I highly recommend this tool to anyone who changes their own plugs, as this one SAVED MY BACON!


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https://www.amazon.com/Powerbuilt-6...ocphy=9031645&hvtargid=pla-448582616067&psc=1
 

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Great news. Glad to hear it…, this was the success I was expecting to read about the first time, but patience and perseverance still won out in the end. Thanks for sharing your experience too, because the same thing is going to bite someone else eventually.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Great news. Glad to hear it…, this was the success I was expecting to read about the first time, but patience and perseverance still won out in the end. Thanks for sharing your experience too, because the same thing is going to bite someone else eventually.
I'm amazed at how few people know the back tap tool even exists. When the issue first occurred, I did a lot of YouTube searching for how to fix a stripped plug thread and most of them involved traditional tapping and helicoil inserts. Thankfully, I happened on the YouTube video about using the back tap. I hope this thread helps someone else going forward. (y)
 
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