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Discussion Starter #1
Sadly, my riding in the last couple years is only for recreation and rare at that. I keep an older Bikemaster maintainer attached and it shows full charge (separate charger also says full). When I hit the start button, just rapid clicking. Now that I already have a new battery on the way, and forgot about the start switch issue on these.. Is that likely the start button or a bad battery?
 

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Probably the battery.
How old is it?
Oxidation could also give a high resistance connection at the battery post.
Put a voltmeter on the battery and see what happens when Ign switch turned on.
What happens to battery voltage when Starter switch engaged???
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Battery is only about 2 years old. Yuasa YTX14BS. I cleaned and greased the start switch when I changed the battery. Only a few hundred miles since. When charger and maintainer say full charge, in bike and connected, only shows about 10.5v and drops to about 6v when I hit starter. Tried to jump with car (I know, don't..) it would try to turn over once then clicks rapidly. Wasn't able to push start either but I may not have gotten it moving enough.. Bike is heavy!! lol
 

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Wherever you jumped from and to on your VTX appears it did not get any jump at all from the car.

Starter relay clicks from low voltage.
Drops outs from low voltage, relay contacts open, voltage goes up, relay engages again..
6 volts and the trip meters reset to zero.

Clean battery posts and cable lugs.
You can jump again from car, I prefer without engine running.
Let it sit that way for a few minutes before trying to crank.

When charger/maintainer shows full charge and you see about 10.5 volts there is a problem.
I still suspect corroded connections at the battery post.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Everything at the battery as far as connections was perfect, looks like new. Battery is clean. Only extra connection is the harness for the maintainer connector. I suspect a bad battery because it only shows 10.5v. That is strange to me. Whether I charged it on the bike or on my bench it shows full charge at 10.5v with 2 different voltmeters.

When I tried to jump it, I was leery to mess around too much. Don't like jumping a bike from a car battery. But I did with nothing running on the car, key off. + and - to battery on car. + to battery, - to side seat bolt on bike (in frame). It cranked very slowly. Actually I don't remember if it turned over 2-3 times and then stopped or started clicking from VR. I was quite annoyed by then and didn't want to keep trying from car and damage something.

New battery will be here in a day or 2 and I'll try it out.
 

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Check the voltage when the maintainer is on, it may have a problem.

A shorted cell but if it drops to 6v possibly an open cell.

NAPA generally uses a good battery tester with a 100 amp load.

I do not use a maintainer, but I have a few wall-warts that top out at 13.8 to 14.4 volts
that are intermittently used on the lawn mower battery, the VTX and the PU that rarely is driven.
 

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Ive had to put two starter solenoids on my vtx. Giving me the same issue. I used to use a screw drive as a jumper to start the bike can always give that a try
 

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Regardless of the problem...starter button is part of regular maintainance routine....:thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It was the battery. Start switch was spotless. I don't get why the charger and tender both say fully charged at 10.5v. That's what it shows with or without either connected to the battery. Oh well. Wasted Yuasa..
 

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If your charger/maintainer does not keep the battery at 12.7 volts minimum, then can it.
There are several stages of charging.

My manual process(winter) is to charge a battery at 14.4 volts for a day, repeat a month later.

https://www.iotaengineering.com/pplib/Charging_Stored_Batteries.pdf
Sulfation, Undercharging, and Battery Failure
The leading cause of battery failure is sulfation. Sulfation is a deposit of lead
sulfate crystals on the charging plates that resists the battery’s ability to accept a charge.
Eventually, the deposits will prohibit charging, reducing both the
battery’s capacity and functional life. The source of the sulfate is the water and
sulfuric acid electrolyte solution inside the battery. An ongoing electrochemical
reaction between opposite charges occurs in the electrolyte solution that produces electrons.
These reactions are at their optimal state while the battery is at
the correct full charge, but are diminished when the battery is undercharged or overcharged.
During normal charge and discharge some minor sulfation occurs, but major sulfation
can develop when the battery is stored in an uncharged or undercharged
condition, which eventually slows and stops the electrochemical reactions. If these
reactions stop, sulfation is accelerated as the sulfur leaches out of the electrolyte
solution and attaches itself to the lead charging plates. As more crystals deposit on
the charging plate, the ability for the battery to accept full charge diminishes, and
undercharging worsens. This is a downward spiral to premature battery failure.

Two common maintenance practices that contribute to
sulfation are storing batteries in an uncharged condition and undercharging.
Both of these conditions can be prevented by using smart charging technology to safely
maintain stored batteries at full charge.
 

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I lost a battery in the past (different bike years ago) with my Battery Tender Jr. It has since been replaced. But I have learned my lesson. Don't just leave a battery tender attached to a battery and ASSUME it will kick back on. My tender said it was fully charged, but once I unplugged it then waited until the red light is flashing and plugged it back in it showed that the battery was <80%.

So, my practice is, once a week or once every two weeks, I unplug my tender between the tender and the battery, wait a minute then reconnect it. So, even if the tender fails to identify the drop in battery, I wont lose my battery.

So, to sum it up, sometimes a battery tender may not identify that the battery's voltage has dropped below the 80% mark, unplugging and plugging back in the battery can help.

(I have a historic car, so I have a few tenders)
 
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