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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone, this is my first post here so I hope I'm doing it in the right forum. Anyway, I'll try to be as clear and as fast as possible. This last weekend, I replaced the stock pipes on my '06 1300C with V&H BigShots. In doing so, I managed to bust the lower rod bolt (even with the flange) on the rear exhaust manifold. I was unable to extract the bolt at the time, and needed to get the pipes installed ASAP. I'm planning on trying to double-nut it when I get some free time, to see if I can remove it that way. I've been reading all over vtxoa about this problem, and I'm confident that I can extract it using this method. Anyway, the pipes are currently installed, and sound great, but naturally I'm having a lot backfire issues. I'm hoping that simply installing the second bolt will rectify this, but can anyone tell me if this is damaging to any components, i.e. engine, carb, pipes...I'm taking it on about a 400 mile trip this weekend, and I'm not sure that I'll have time beforehand to extract and replace the rod bolt. Also, I've read that the suggested torque of the newly installed rod bolt be 17 ft. lbs. But what exactly is the best way to tighten it up? Basically just do a reverse double-nut? Oh, and FWIW, I have NOT done the pair valve removal, SCAR method, or jacked with the A/F mix on the carb at all. Thanks in advance for any and all answers/solutions.
 

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Go to the Honda shop or ACE and buy a new exhaust stud and fix it before you go. Yes you can eventually cut through the exhaust gasket and then through the exhaust port if you take it on this trip as is. Fix it now or pay a lot later, your call
 

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lacking both bolts can and most likely will cause the backfire issues. Pair valve removal will certainly help. If you still have room enough to get 2 nuts on the broken stud, I would make the time to fix that prior to making a 400 mile trip.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys. I will try to get it done tomorrow evening then. I've already bought the new rod bolt at ACE about an hour after I broke the old one off. I have enough room on the threads to double-nut, however I am unable to find 2 nuts of different sizes. When I put both of the identically sized nuts on there, and try to back the stud out, the end result is that the 2 nuts spin off together. Any hits on how to get around that? Maybe just go to a nut and bolt specialty store and hunt down a larger or smaller sized nut? ACE only had one sized nut with that particular thread and inside diameter. Also, would you recommend replacing the crush gaskets yet again? I put 2 new ones on during the pipe install. Finally, do you recommend just hack sawing the rod bolt to the correct length, and then cleaning the threads up with a small file?
 

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Just went through this. if you have enough to put a double nut on it try that .
Other wise I had to cut the stud off used a grinder, then using a drill index puched the stud and drilled it out. Inserted a Helicoil, working good.
Don't put it off it will only get more expensive.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Go to the Honda shop or ACE and buy a new exhaust stud and fix it before you go. Yes you can eventually cut through the exhaust gasket and then through the exhaust port if you take it on this trip as is. Fix it now or pay a lot later, your call
I went to the Honda dealership to get the exhaust rod bolt before I went to ACE, and if you can believe it, the did NOT know what I was talking about. The dude even pulled up on his parts list on his computer, and he couldn't find it. He sold me the OEM nut, though, at around $6. I went to ACE with the newly purchased nut, and matched it up with the correct rod bolt in about 2 minutes. I really do not understand dealerships sometimes.
 

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Can you get hold of it with a pair of vice grips?
 

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Maybe he's never heard of it called a "rod bolt" like I have never heard of that.
Called exhaust stud, here's the Honda part number that can be cross matched;

BOLT, STUD (8X28)
92900-08028-0E
 

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This has been fairly common, sometimes it happens when the acorn bottoms on the stud so that when you attempt to tighten the nut you're really tightening the stud and then the stud seizes in the head and twists off when you try to loosen it. Don't know if you're a welder or have access to one. It is VERY easy to just knock a nut partially down on the stud and weld the inside of the nut to the stud. Then just use a socket and turn it out. When I've done this the heat alone apparently loosens it as there is really no tension on the nut when you turn it. I've replaced the acorns with stainless flange nuts. Available in 12 or 13mm, I use the 13 as it matches the other stock exhaust nuts.

I'd guess you could probably braze it on with mapp too.

Before welding


After replacement
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Maybe he's never heard of it called a "rod bolt" like I have never heard of that.
Called exhaust stud, here's the Honda part number that can be cross matched;

BOLT, STUD (8X28)
92900-08028-0E
Nah, pretty sure he's just retarded, lol. He looked at me like I was talking to him in a different language. Anyway, yea it's called about 3 or 4 different things, from what I gather. I'm not sure what name I called it when I was trying to explain the situation to him, but I put it simply enough for a 3rd grader to understand, or so I thought. Thanks for the part number, that'll help me out a lot.

Ride safe
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This has been fairly common, sometimes it happens when the acorn bottoms on the stud so that when you attempt to tighten the nut you're really tightening the stud and then the stud seizes in the head and twists off when you try to loosen it. Don't know if you're a welder or have access to one. It is VERY easy to just knock a nut partially down on the stud and weld the inside of the nut to the stud. Then just use a socket and turn it out. When I've done this the heat alone apparently loosens it as there is really no tension on the nut when you turn it. I've replaced the acorns with stainless flange nuts. Available in 12 or 13mm, I use the 13 as it matches the other stock exhaust nuts.

I'd guess you could probably braze it on with mapp too.

Before welding


After replacement
Thanks for the suggestions, Enduro. I'm kind of stuck between a rock and a hard place. I don't have a welding machine, and I really don't have access to one. I guess I could bring it to one of my buddies and have him do it, but then I'd have to bring all my tools out there to his place to re-install the pipes. I've heard of this working for sure, though, so I'll give it a shot if I can't seem to break it loose another way. I might go home and try to take my Dremel tool and cut a screwdriver groove into the top of the stud, and try backing it out using a screwdriver. Thanks again for your help.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks everyone. I was finally able to get the broken stud out, using a jam nut. I got a new stud in, and re-installed the pipes. However, the exhaust is still backfiring and popping, pretty much every time i deaccel and/or downshift. Could this be caused by not replacing the crush gaskets? I had just replaced them the weekend before, when I initially broke the exhaust stud. The pipes had less than 100 miles on them, so I didn't feel it was necessary to replace the crush gaskets again. Should I have? Or could it possibly be an air/fuel mixture thing? Maybe I just need to remove the pair valves. But I'm hesitant to tighten up the exhaust bolts any further, as I don't want to strip them out.
 

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Acorn nuts

Did you use the acorn nuts ? If you did you should put a flat washer under it , because the acorn tends to bottom out on the stud, before the flange is tightened up to the torque spec. I put the flat washers on and the took care of almost all the backfire issues. Once I install the block off plates, I should be all set to go.

Steve#3 8)
 

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The crush washer is to seal the exhaust and manifold. Whether it had 1 mile or 100,000 miles makes no difference. I think anytime you are taking the pipes loose you should figure on changing the crush gaskets.


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Remove the pair valve and it should stop.
 

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The crush washer is to seal the exhaust and manifold. Whether it had 1 mile or 100,000 miles makes no difference. I think anytime you are taking the pipes loose you should figure on changing the crush gaskets.
Exactly, changing the gasket would have been a breeze.
 

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I know, but I did it this past weekend and thought for sure it wouldn't have sealed 100% yet, so I tried to make them work. I'll replace them with new gaskets tonight. Thanks.
Since you only had 1 bolt on the rear I would guess it seated funny. The crush gaskets are not like shingles that take a little heat and time to seat properly. If the are not seated at first, they are not going to fix itself afterwards.


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Discussion Starter #20
Since you only had 1 bolt on the rear I would guess it seated funny. The crush gaskets are not like shingles that take a little heat and time to seat properly. If the are not seated at first, they are not going to fix itself afterwards.


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I'll get them changed again tonight, with lock washers behind the acorn nuts. Thanks, buddy. Ride safe.
 
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