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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bare:

There has been so much info on this subject that I honestly don't know what is the best way to proceed.

I bought a VTX 1800 F a month ago. I am approaching 600 miles on the bike. The owners manual indicates that there is no service necessary on the bike until it reaches 4 K miles. There is no way that I am going to keep the original oil in my bike that long. I ordered some Motorcycle Specific Amsoil 10 W 40 and one of their Absolute Efficiency Nano-fiber filters. Amsoil tech told me that I could make that change at 600 miles.

Do you think that the motor is sufficiently broken in at 600 miles to switch to full synthetic???

I DID NOT INTEND FOR THIS TO START AN OIL DISCUSSION. I know how much that is enjoyed. :)

Thanks in advance for your advice. I look forward to meeting you eventually and having you maintain my cycle, if you have the time and
want to do it.

Joe :tools1:
 

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My usual recommendation is this... 600ish miles (this early on a couple hundred miles over won't kill you) and change with a cheap dino (non-synthetic) oil and filter. This oil can be cheap, it doesn't matter - even the worst oils out there should easily protect you for these few miles. Run this cheap oil for another 600ish miles and then change to synthetic.
Save the good filter for when you go to synthetic, any cheap filter (besides Fram) should work here as well.

This means that you're going to change to synthetic at around 1200ish miles depending on how close to 600 miles you actually change. As I said before, the 600 doesn't have to be exact, just don't go under 600 miles.

Past that, Amsoil has lab tested good to round 10k miles - so change with Amsoil once per year or every 10k miles, whichever comes first.

As for other service, this is strictly personal preference. Some like to keep the original factory final drive oil in for a long time because it's loaded with Moly, others change it also. I change mine, but it's definitely not necessary. It's much more important to check all the fasteners on the bike during this early maintenance. Grab a torque wrench and a shop manual:

http://www.bareasschoppers.com/torque/1800CTorques.pdf

And check as many fasteners as you can get to.

As for doing service on the bike, always glad to assist - just drop me an email or give me a call. My info is on the contact list or click my links below. :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Bare:

As per the fasteners......I may contact you soon to see if you have the time to do the check on my bike. I found my rear shock bolt so loose I could tighten it with my finger. You are a lot more familiar with the fasteners....especially the location of the critical ones. I will fire off a P M and see if you have some time soon to spend a little time with the bike. I will cetainly do whatever I can in the meantime. I can do a little, but I am not much of a mechanic. I don't think there are too many good ones at the dealerships either.

Not to mention that I do not own a torque wrench.

Joe
 

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threexcharm said:
Thanks Bare:

As per the fasteners......I may contact you soon to see if you have the time to do the check on my bike. I found my rear shock bolt so loose I could tighten it with my finger. You are a lot more familiar with the fasteners....especially the location of the critical ones. I will fire off a P M and see if you have some time soon to spend a little time with the bike. I will cetainly do whatever I can in the meantime. I can do a little, but I am not much of a mechanic. I don't think there are too many good ones at the dealerships either.

Not to mention that I do not own a torque wrench.

Joe
Joe,
I certainly don't mind doing what I can to help out, but unless you're a guy who doesn't like to touch the wrenches at all I'll make a small suggestion. When you get the time and $$, spend a few bucks and buy an owners manual and torque wrench. Sears sells one inexpensively enough that you could grab one on sale and then you'd be set to do some basic work on the bike.
Again, I'm always glad to help out - but for little things here and there a manual and wrench are invaluable and gives you that quality "bonding" time with your scoot. :twisted:

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Whatever you decide I'm here to help. :wink:
 
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