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Hi, I'm the proud new owner of a 2006 vtx 1300. I've been told that I'm changing gears too early, but when I push it further than what I've been doing it starts to vibrate, big time. This is my first cruiser.

Any sugestions on when I should be going into 2nd, 3rd, 4th , and then 5th?
 

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It depends on how fast you're trying to accelerate, but when I'm in a "hurry", here's a guess as to when I change:

2nd at 25
3rd at 40
4th at 55
5th at 70

If I'm just putting around, maybe something like this:

2nd at 15
3rd at 25
4th at 40
5th at 55

When I'm in a "big hurry", here's a guess as to when I change:

2nd at 35
3rd at 55
4th at 70
5th at 85

You'll gradually learn to listen to the engine and know when to change gears. Just be patient.

Eddie
 

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I'd say if the bikes not chugging when you shift you are fine on the low side. as far as over revving, you can't , it has a rev limiter on it. Vibrations ........... OHHHH YEEAAAAAHHHHH BAAAABBBYYYY enjoy the twin. Thats what she's supposed to do.
Enjoy the bike. Welcome aboard the "X" family and board.
Ride safe
Smokey
 

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see, what i'd like to know (as an ex-sportbike rider), is where the rev limiter kicks in (in terms of MPH) in each gear. i'll hit 40mph in first, and i know i'm pushing the limit, but i'd like to have the benchmark without having to test each gear :)
 

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Try it and find out. That is the fun of owning a bike.

chainedlightning said:
see, what i'd like to know (as an ex-sportbike rider), is where the rev limiter kicks in (in terms of MPH) in each gear. i'll hit 40mph in first, and i know i'm pushing the limit, but i'd like to have the benchmark without having to test each gear :)
 

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chainedlightning said:
see, what i'd like to know (as an ex-sportbike rider), is where the rev limiter kicks in (in terms of MPH) in each gear. i'll hit 40mph in first, and i know i'm pushing the limit, but i'd like to have the benchmark without having to test each gear :)
Just do it...it won't hurt anything, even though it sounds like it! :lol: Then you'll know and probably won't do it again...you really have to go some for it to kick in. 8)
 

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From Clayton Root via silvervtx04

See if this helps:

silvervtx04s said:
A good post from sometime back..

Clayton Root



Joined: 25 Nov 2003
Posts: 494
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Posted: Wed Feb 25, 2004 10:19 am Post subject: Re: Gear Shifting

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

VTXmike wrote:
Guys,

I just transitioned from a sport bike and miss the Tach. On the 1300, without a Tach, I am shifting as follows;

1st to 2nd at 35Mph
2nd to 3rd at 55Mph
3rd to 4th at 70Mph
4th to 5th at 85Mph

Is this okay or am I winding the gears out too much.

Please advise.

Mike


The SHORT answer is NO. You are not pushing your bike beyond Honda's limits. In fact, you have a considerable margin of safety left. However, the VTX 1300 also has enough torque to shift considerably earlier without lugging.

The LONG answer is below and I posted it once before but that was probably on the old board as I couldn't find it with a search. If you suffer from insomnia, you can try reading this before going to bed. You should drift right off!

I am a Metrologist by profession (not a Meteorologist), ie I work in the field of calibration and measurement within the Electro-Mechanical Development Lab at 3M Company so maybe this is one for me to tackle.

Here are the numbers you need to do the math. These came straight from the Honda Service Manual.

Primary Reduction Ratio = 1.935
Secondary Reduction Ratio = 0.944
Final Reduction Ratio = 2.818

1st gear = 1.900
2nd gear = 1.148
3rd gear = 0.912
4th gear = 0.778
5th gear = 0.697

Rear Tire Size 170/80-15

It doesn’t matter what a tach is reading if you have one or what your speedometer is reading either (we all know how accurate they are) because this is a fixed mechanical relationship, ie your wheel is attached to rear end gears which are connected through the shaft to the transmission, secondary gears, primary gears, and finally to the engine crankshaft. Any changes to carburetion, pipes, windshields, etc. have no effect on this relationship. Those factors may change the perceived feel and strain on the bike but this mechanical relationship is fixed. However, changing tire size or a slipping clutch would affect the outcome and on chain driven motorcycles, sprockets can be altered.

First step is to know the outside circumference of the driven tire. The VTX has a 170/80-15 tire which means it is 170 mm wide. Since the aspect ratio is 80%, that means the distance from the ground to the wheel is 170 x 0.8 = 136 millimeters. For the metrically challenged, that is 13.6 centimeters. There are 2.54 centimeters in 1” so the ground to wheel distance is 13.6/2.54 = 5.354”. Now we can calculate the the tire diameter which is 5.354 x 2 (top & bottom) plus the wheel diameter of 15” for a total of 25.71”. The tire circumference is Pi times Diameter (Pi = 3.1416) so we have 25.71 x 3.1416 which is 80.77 inches. Divide that by 12 inches and for each tire rotation, the bike will travel 6.73 feet. In one mile, the tire will rotate 5280/6.73 = 784.55 revolutions. Doesn’t matter which gear you’re in, that is always the number of wheel revolutions per mile (at least until your tire starts wearing down). For sake of simplicity, I will calculate the engine revolutions per minute for the various gears at 60 mph since it takes one minute to travel one mile at that speed. Just divide whatever speed you’re going by 60 and multiply it by these calculated rpms to determine your engine revs at various speeds within any given gear.

Since the Primary, Secondary, and Final Reduction Ratios are always the same, we’ll calculate that overall ratio first. 1.935 x 0.944 x 2.818 = 5.147
1st gear = 1.900
2nd gear = 1.148
3rd gear = 0.912
4th gear = 0.778
5th gear = 0.697

You will notice that the gear ratios for 3rd, 4th, and 5th gears are less than ONE which lets you know they are all Overdrive gears (for bragging rights, while lazily cruising down the road at 70 mph in 5th, you can tell your friends you kicked this sucker into Overdrive two gears ago). You’ll also notice that after the BIG jump from 1st to 2nd gear, the rest are all pretty close ratios. Personally I find 4th gear to be pretty much a joke. This bike could easily get along with 4 gears by dropping 3rd gear down to about 0.850 but I digress. All rpm numbers below are rounded off to the nearest 10 rpm for simplicity of reading.

At 60 mph:

5th Gear 784.55 x 5.147 x 0.697 = 2,810 rpms
4th Gear 784.55 x 5.147 x 0.778 = 3140 rpms
3rd Gear 784.55 x 5.147 x 0.912 = 3680 rpms
2nd Gear 784.55 x 5.147 x 1.148 = 4640 rpms
1st Gear 784.55 x 5.147 x 1.900 = 7670 rpms

Now, the next time someone tells you they had their VTX going 60 mph in low gear, just give them a friendly nod and walk away.

I don’t know when the VTX’s rev limiter kicks in but Honda specifies peak horsepower at 5,000 rpm so it can easily rev that high. The engine can probably safely go 5,500 but I’ll just calculate speeds in each gear at 5,000 rpm to be prudent. Kilometers per hour have also been listed for the other 94% of the world’s population.

1st gear 5000/7670 x 60 = 39 mph (62 kph)
2nd gear 5000/4640 x 60 = 65 mph (104 kph) (yes Patricia, there is a Santa Claus and it is possible to go over 60 mph in 2nd gear)
3rd gear 5000/3680 x 60 = 82 mph (131 kph)
4th gear 5000/3140 x 60 = 96 mph (154 kph)
5th gear 5000/2810 x 60 = 107 mph (171 kph)

For what it’s worth, if the VTX can reach 120 mph in 5th gear, it will be spinning 5,620 rpm.

"And now you know the rest of the story". Piece of cake, eh?
I agree with previous posts which encourage you to run to the rev limiter in the gears so that you'll know, first-hand, what your bike will do. I regularly run the bike to 40 in first and 70 in second (indicated--which isn't actual because of our speedometer), and I've been doing this for 19,000 miles. The plugs look good, the oil-level remains within acceptable limits, and the engine generally seems to run stronger than ever.
 

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From the Owner's Manual ( I find it pretty unreasonable):

" Ride in the highest gear that lets the engine run and accellerate smoothly. This will give you good fuel economy and effective emissions control. When changing gears under normal conditions, use these shift points: "

Shifting up:
1st to 2nd - 12 mph
2nd to 3rd - 19 mph
3rd to 4th - 25 mph
4th to 5th - 31 mph

Shifting Down:
5th to 4th - 22 mph
4th to 3rd - 16 mph

So basically by the time you are past 31 mph, you should be in 5th gear? Yeah right! :roll:
 

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Re: From Clayton Root via silvervtx04

danX said:
See if this helps:

silvervtx04s said:
A good post from sometime back..

Clayton Root



Joined: 25 Nov 2003
Posts: 494
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Posted: Wed Feb 25, 2004 10:19 am Post subject: Re: Gear Shifting

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

VTXmike wrote:
Guys,

I just transitioned from a sport bike and miss the Tach. On the 1300, without a Tach, I am shifting as follows;

1st to 2nd at 35Mph
2nd to 3rd at 55Mph
3rd to 4th at 70Mph
4th to 5th at 85Mph

Is this okay or am I winding the gears out too much.

Please advise.

Mike


The SHORT answer is NO. You are not pushing your bike beyond Honda's limits. In fact, you have a considerable margin of safety left. However, the VTX 1300 also has enough torque to shift considerably earlier without lugging.

The LONG answer is below and I posted it once before but that was probably on the old board as I couldn't find it with a search. If you suffer from insomnia, you can try reading this before going to bed. You should drift right off!

I am a Metrologist by profession (not a Meteorologist), ie I work in the field of calibration and measurement within the Electro-Mechanical Development Lab at 3M Company so maybe this is one for me to tackle.

Here are the numbers you need to do the math. These came straight from the Honda Service Manual.

Primary Reduction Ratio = 1.935
Secondary Reduction Ratio = 0.944
Final Reduction Ratio = 2.818

1st gear = 1.900
2nd gear = 1.148
3rd gear = 0.912
4th gear = 0.778
5th gear = 0.697

Rear Tire Size 170/80-15

It doesn’t matter what a tach is reading if you have one or what your speedometer is reading either (we all know how accurate they are) because this is a fixed mechanical relationship, ie your wheel is attached to rear end gears which are connected through the shaft to the transmission, secondary gears, primary gears, and finally to the engine crankshaft. Any changes to carburetion, pipes, windshields, etc. have no effect on this relationship. Those factors may change the perceived feel and strain on the bike but this mechanical relationship is fixed. However, changing tire size or a slipping clutch would affect the outcome and on chain driven motorcycles, sprockets can be altered.

First step is to know the outside circumference of the driven tire. The VTX has a 170/80-15 tire which means it is 170 mm wide. Since the aspect ratio is 80%, that means the distance from the ground to the wheel is 170 x 0.8 = 136 millimeters. For the metrically challenged, that is 13.6 centimeters. There are 2.54 centimeters in 1” so the ground to wheel distance is 13.6/2.54 = 5.354”. Now we can calculate the the tire diameter which is 5.354 x 2 (top & bottom) plus the wheel diameter of 15” for a total of 25.71”. The tire circumference is Pi times Diameter (Pi = 3.1416) so we have 25.71 x 3.1416 which is 80.77 inches. Divide that by 12 inches and for each tire rotation, the bike will travel 6.73 feet. In one mile, the tire will rotate 5280/6.73 = 784.55 revolutions. Doesn’t matter which gear you’re in, that is always the number of wheel revolutions per mile (at least until your tire starts wearing down). For sake of simplicity, I will calculate the engine revolutions per minute for the various gears at 60 mph since it takes one minute to travel one mile at that speed. Just divide whatever speed you’re going by 60 and multiply it by these calculated rpms to determine your engine revs at various speeds within any given gear.

Since the Primary, Secondary, and Final Reduction Ratios are always the same, we’ll calculate that overall ratio first. 1.935 x 0.944 x 2.818 = 5.147
1st gear = 1.900
2nd gear = 1.148
3rd gear = 0.912
4th gear = 0.778
5th gear = 0.697

You will notice that the gear ratios for 3rd, 4th, and 5th gears are less than ONE which lets you know they are all Overdrive gears (for bragging rights, while lazily cruising down the road at 70 mph in 5th, you can tell your friends you kicked this sucker into Overdrive two gears ago). You’ll also notice that after the BIG jump from 1st to 2nd gear, the rest are all pretty close ratios. Personally I find 4th gear to be pretty much a joke. This bike could easily get along with 4 gears by dropping 3rd gear down to about 0.850 but I digress. All rpm numbers below are rounded off to the nearest 10 rpm for simplicity of reading.

At 60 mph:

5th Gear 784.55 x 5.147 x 0.697 = 2,810 rpms
4th Gear 784.55 x 5.147 x 0.778 = 3140 rpms
3rd Gear 784.55 x 5.147 x 0.912 = 3680 rpms
2nd Gear 784.55 x 5.147 x 1.148 = 4640 rpms
1st Gear 784.55 x 5.147 x 1.900 = 7670 rpms

Now, the next time someone tells you they had their VTX going 60 mph in low gear, just give them a friendly nod and walk away.

I don’t know when the VTX’s rev limiter kicks in but Honda specifies peak horsepower at 5,000 rpm so it can easily rev that high. The engine can probably safely go 5,500 but I’ll just calculate speeds in each gear at 5,000 rpm to be prudent. Kilometers per hour have also been listed for the other 94% of the world’s population.

1st gear 5000/7670 x 60 = 39 mph (62 kph)
2nd gear 5000/4640 x 60 = 65 mph (104 kph) (yes Patricia, there is a Santa Claus and it is possible to go over 60 mph in 2nd gear)
3rd gear 5000/3680 x 60 = 82 mph (131 kph)
4th gear 5000/3140 x 60 = 96 mph (154 kph)
5th gear 5000/2810 x 60 = 107 mph (171 kph)

For what it’s worth, if the VTX can reach 120 mph in 5th gear, it will be spinning 5,620 rpm.

"And now you know the rest of the story". Piece of cake, eh?
I agree with previous posts which encourage you to run to the rev limiter in the gears so that you'll know, first-hand, what your bike will do. I regularly run the bike to 40 in first and 70 in second (indicated--which isn't actual because of our speedometer), and I've been doing this for 19,000 miles. The plugs look good, the oil-level remains within acceptable limits, and the engine generally seems to run stronger than ever.
That's it...run it hard...it likes it. :wink: I know a guy with another 1300 that likes to ride it in what I call putt-putt mode...he is always complaining about vibration. The harder I ride mine, the smoother it seems to run. :lol: 8)
 

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And who says engineers don't have a sense of humor? FYI: These shift points are required to meet the epa emissions standards - That is the only reason Honda puts them in the manual. In reality your bike will be at too low of an rpm at most of these.

BornOnFire said:
From the Owner's Manual ( I find it pretty unreasonable):

" Ride in the highest gear that lets the engine run and accellerate smoothly. This will give you good fuel economy and effective emissions control. When changing gears under normal conditions, use these shift points: "

Shifting up:
1st to 2nd - 12 mph
2nd to 3rd - 19 mph
3rd to 4th - 25 mph
4th to 5th - 31 mph

Shifting Down:
5th to 4th - 22 mph
4th to 3rd - 16 mph

So basically by the time you are past 31 mph, you should be in 5th gear? Yeah right! :roll:
 
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