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At 57 years old, I completed the 2-day course for a Virginia motorcycle permit with no prior street experience.. hadn't sat on a motorcycle in 40 years. The 2002 VTX1800 at a Harley dealership was delivered to my door in Citrus County Florida - February 2019. First few weeks were terrifying. But I went out every other day for a 40-minute ride and slowly developed the reflexes, coordination and slow-turning skills. YouTube instructional videos helped greatly. It was this gradual, low risk approach that led to today - where I can pull U-turns on busy city streets, lean into winding mountain roads and cruise divided highways full of aggressive drivers at 80mph. Why?? No more kids to raise, and nothing left to prove professionally. This has transformed an otherwise boring, middle-aged guy's life. I suspect some of you are thinking "he's just lucky he hasn't dropped the bike or been hit yet..." The first video I saw "Five ways to die on a motorcycle" helped set my attitude in the right direction. It seems that being cautious, and always leaving room to correct a situation helped. I was coming down a hill when the cars ahead suddenly stopped behind a guy waiting to make a left turn. I didn't think I had enough room to stop, but applied front and rear brakes while scouting an escape lane around the shoulder of the road. As it happens, the bike stopped in time... thanks to good advice and good practice. After seven months of riding and 4,000 miles in all kinds of places I don't think I'll ever give this up. And I don't think I could ride anything with less power than a Honda VTX1800 with Kuryaken intake and Vance Hines pipes.
 

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Welcome to VTXOA VaughanDaddy. Starting out on a VTX 1800 is a pretty big challenge but it sounds like you're coming along good. I would recommend that you also take the MSF basic rider course as soon as you can. There is a lot of information about all VTX's here from general information, maintenance, step-by-step how-to's, etc... Some basic things you should be aware of are that the Fuel Pump Regulators or FPR's are known to fail if they are more than 10 years old. One way to tell if yours is bad is if your engine oil reeks of gasoline. If so, you'll need to replace it before riding it any more. The ground fix is something that needs to be done to all 1800. Unless your brake and clutch fluids look clear and fresh, they should be changed. These are fine motorcycles and you will enjoy having it for years to come. Post some pictures....
 

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Welcome. You've made a fine choice in your bike. Maybe not a 'traditional starter', but one that (as you've shown) can clearly be mastered even by a beginner. And one more good point... it's one you are less likely to "outgrow" as compared to smaller bikes.


Stay safe, and stay in the saddle. :thumbup:
 

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Welcome to the VTXOA.
1800 has a linked brake system, it works well from what I have read..

Enjoy the ride.

Stay away from old people in cages, they are dangerous.
 

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Thanks pushrod.. I think the previous owner must have taken care of these things.. all fluids are clean. The bike came with new tires, brakes and evidence of good general care. Wish I could find and thank the previous owner... he was trading this in for a Harley.. I hope he had no regrets.
 

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Thanks, dud-57... The safety course instructor warned against anything below 650cc for a starter bike. Then a sales rep at Classic Iron in Fredericksburg warned me against anything less than 1100-1300 on the grounds that I'd outgrow it quickly. Apparently the VTX1800 may be the only bike that is low enough and easy enough to master - if carefully. But then a 50 yr old buddy saw my VTX pics and immediately took the 2 day course in Ohio before getting himself a Vulcan 900. He's my size but swears the Vulcan is enough bike for him.. interesting stuff.
 

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Thanks Arizona.. yes, MC Rider's "five ways to die.." should be mandatory viewing for all new riders. Also, his video about not "laying down your bike.." You know, when I got into that situation I was sure I'd have to lay down this VTX to avoid collision but MC's advice literally came to mind at the moment and I focused on good braking.
 

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Welcome to the club! I would double down on replacing the fuel pressure regulator. It's about $40 on Amazon and takes about 15 minutes to change. Putting it at about the inconvenience level of an oil change. Unless you're 100% sure it's been recently changed out, I'd change it. It's very cheap insurance that you won't be left stranded, or worse.
 

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Nice of you to join us.

I’ve attached results of numerous studies on motorcycle accidents that I found interesting. Pay special attention to #25 specifically in your case. Ride as if you are invisible because often, you are.
Be safe.


Little Known Facts About Motorcycle Accidents

Motorcycle accidents, though not necessarily more common than other motor vehicle accidents, can be more shocking and devastating. But, they can also be caused by some unique circumstances. A number of studies and surveys have discovered some interesting facts and statistics about motorcycle accidents:

1. Approximately ¾ of motorcycle accidents involve collisions with another vehicle, most often a passenger automobile.

2. Only about ¼ of motorcycle accidents are single vehicle accidents involving the motorcycle colliding with the roadway or some fixed object in the environment.

3. Vehicle failure accounts for less than 3% of motorcycle accidents, and most of those are single vehicle accidents where control is lost due to a puncture flat.

4. In single vehicle accidents, about 2/3 of the accidents are caused by rider error, typically a slide-out and fall due to overbraking or running wide on a curve due to excess speed or under-cornering.

5. Roadway defects (pavement ridges, potholes, etc.) cause only about 2% of all motorcycle accidents; and animals account for only about 1% of all accidents.

6. In multiple vehicle accidents, 2/3 of the accidents are caused by the other vehicle violating the motorcycle's right-of-way.

7. The failure of motorists to detect and recognize motorcycles in traffic is the predominating cause of motorcycle accidents. The driver of the other vehicle involved in collision with the motorcycle did not see the motorcycle before the collision, or did not see the motorcycle until too late to avoid the collision.

8. Deliberate hostile action by a motorist against a motorcycle rider is a rare accident cause. The most frequent accident configuration is the motorcycle proceeding straight then the automobile makes a left turn in front of the oncoming motorcycle.

10. Intersections are the most likely place for the motorcycle accident, with the other vehicle violating the motorcycle's right-of-way, and often violating other traffic controls (i.e., changing lanes, running the light or stop sign, etc.).

11. In 98% of motorcycle accidents, weather does not contribute to the accident.

12. Most motorcycle accidents occur during a short trip associated with shopping, errands, friends, entertainment, or recreation, and usually occurs very shortly after the beginning of the trip.

13. The view of the motorcycle or the other vehicle involved in the accident is limited by glare or obstructed by other vehicles in almost ½ of multiple vehicle accidents.

14. Visibility and conspicuousness of the motorcycle is a critical factor in the multiple vehicle accidents, and accident involvement is significantly reduced by the use of motorcycle headlamps (on in daylight) and the wearing of high visibility yellow, orange or bright red jackets.

15. Fuel system leaks and spills were present in 62% of motorcycle accidents in the post-crash phase, presenting an unusually high risk of fire not present in other types of motor vehicle accidents.

16. The average speed of a motorcycle prior to an accident is 29.8 mph, 21.5 mph at the time of impact, and in only 1/1000 of cases is speed approximately 86 mph at the time of impact.

17. The typical motorcycle pre-crash lines-of-sight to the traffic hazard portray no contribution of the limits of peripheral vision; more than ¾ of all accident hazards are within 45 degrees of either side of straight ahead.

18. Conspicuousness of the motorcycle is most critical for the frontal surfaces of the motorcycle and rider.

19. Vehicle defects related to accident causation are rare and likely to be due to deficient or defective maintenance.

20. Motorcycle riders between the ages of 16 and 24 are significantly overrepresented in accidents; motorcycle riders between the ages of 30 and 50 are significantly underrepresented. Although the majority of the accident-involved motorcycle drivers are male (96%), female motorcycle passengers are significantly overrepresented in the accident data.

22. Craftsmen, laborers, and students comprise most of the accident-involved motorcycle riders. Professionals, sales workers, and craftsmen are underrepresented.

23. Motorcycle riders with previous recent traffic citations and accidents are overrepresented in the accident data.

24. The motorcycle riders involved in accidents are essentially without training; 92% were self-taught or learned from family or friends. Motorcycle rider training experience reduces accident involvement and is related to reduced injuries in the event of accidents.

25. More than ½ of the accident-involved motorcycle riders had less than 5 months experience on the accident motorcycle, although the total street riding experience was almost 3 years. Motorcycle riders with dirt bike experience are significantly underrepresented in the accident data.

26. Lack of attention to the driving task is a common factor for the motorcyclist in an accident.

27. Almost ½ of fatal accidents show alcohol involvement.

28. Motorcycle riders in these accidents showed significant collision avoidance problems. Most riders would overbrake and skid the rear wheel, and underbrake the front wheel greatly reducing collision avoidance deceleration. The ability to countersteer and swerve was essentially absent.

29. The typical motorcycle accident allows the motorcyclist just less than 2 seconds to complete all collision avoidance action.
30. Passenger-carrying motorcycles are not overrepresented in the accident area.

31. The driver of vehicles involved in collisions with motorcycles are not distinguished from other accident populations except that the ages of 20 to 29, and beyond 65 are overrepresented. Also, these drivers are generally not familiar with motorcycles (i.e., are not licensed to operate motorcycles and do not own their own motorcycles).

32. Large displacement motorcycles are underrepresented in accidents but are associated with higher injury severity when involved in accidents.

33. The studies have not identified any relationship to motorcycle color and accident data, but is expected to be insignificant because the frontal surfaces are most often presented to the other vehicle involved in the collision.

34. Motorcycles equipped with fairings and windshields are underrepresented in accidents, most likely because of the contribution to conspicuousness and the association with more experienced and trained riders.

35. Motorcycle riders without a motorcycle license, without any license, or with a license that was revoked are significantly overrepresented in motorcycle accidents.

36. Motorcycle modifications, such as those associated with the semi-chopper or cafe racers, are very significantly overrepresented in accidents.

37. The likelihood of injury is extremely high in motorcycle accidents: 98% of multiple vehicle collisions and 96% of the single vehicle accidents resulted in some kind of injury to the motorcycle rider; 45% resulted in more than a minor injury.

38. Half of the injuries to motorcyclists are to the ankle-foot, lower leg, knee, and thigh-upper leg.

39. Crash bars are not an effective injury countermeasure. The reduction of injury to the ankle-foot is balanced by increase of injury to the thigh-upper leg, knee, and lower leg.

40. The use of heavy boots, jacket, gloves, etc., is effective in preventing or reducing abrasions and lacerations, which are frequent but rarely severe injuries.

41. Groin injuries were sustained by the motorcyclist in at least 13% of the accidents, which typified by multiple vehicle collision in frontal impact at higher than average speed.

42. Injury severity increases with speed, alcohol involvement, and motorcycle size.

43. 73% of the accident-involved motorcycle riders used no eye protection, and it is likely that the wind on the unprotected eyes contributed in impairment of vision which delayed hazard detection.

44. Approximately 50% of motorcycle riders use safety helmets. Only 40% of accident-involved motorcycle riders were wearing helmets at the time of the accident.

45. Voluntary safety helmet use by those accident-involved motorcycle riders was lowest for untrained, uneducated, young motorcycle riders on hot days and short trips.

46. The most deadly injuries to the accident victims were injuries to the chest and head.

47. The use of the safety helmet is the single most critical factor in the prevention of reduction of head injury.

48. Safety helmet use caused no attenuation of critical traffic sounds, no limitation of pre-crash visual field, and no fatigue or loss of attention. No element of accident causation was related to helmet use.

49. The increased coverage of the full facial coverage helmet increases protection, and significantly reduces face injuries.

52. Helmeted riders had fewer neck injuries than un-helmeted riders.

53. Less than 10% of motorcycle riders involved in accidents had insurance of any kind to provide medical care or replace property.
 

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Hey Welcome VaughanDaddy from central New Mexico. Where it's not really new and it's not really Mexico. I've owned a vtx 1300c, 1500Lc Suzuki and now the VTX 1800F. I love the 1800. Have fun and be safe.
 

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some old wise-tails never die....

bike size for a new rider... will never die.. and not true.

its your health and Fitness.... weight to control... ( proper Fit helps )

I started riding in 1969 and NEVER Stopped. approaching 400,000 motorcycle miles in my life.

Never Stop practicing and learning New better skills...

next summer.. look into the MSF advanced rider skills school.
 

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Welcome to the VTXASG (VTX Addition Support Group) .... where we gladly support each other's addiction. :D

Glad you are taking a responsible approach to your riding. *thumbup*
You will love the VTX more and more every day, it is an awesome (and very addictive) machine.
 

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Well now. That's good,my car tire didn't cause my bike to burst into flames ,and,about 5weeks ago a sob with no ins turned left across my lane and caused me to crash into him. I was so close when he turned I almost hit his front end.
 
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