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I have and 1800 and I was just wondering if the 1300 had a choke or not?

I don't really know whay I am wondering, it just popped up in the skull..
 

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yep. we're not F.I. with the 1300. Doc
 

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Technically not a "choke" where the air flow is restricted....instead its a "fuel enrichener"....adds more fuel top the circuit....
 

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It says CHOKE on the knob and it enriches the fuel duh

=shadango;2115491]Technically not a "choke" where the air flow is restricted....instead its a "fuel enrichener"....adds more fuel top the circuit....
[/quote]


Duh.....as I clearly already stated, a traditional choke adjusts the amount of air going in to the carb.....in other word it "chokes" the air.....CHOKE MEANS "REDUCE FLOW" it doesnt enrich the fuel, it reduces the air to make the fuel/air ratio higher.

Our "choke" enriches ....enrich means "add"....it adds fuel......

Hence, the reason I stated "technically". Duh.

Yes, it is still considered a "choke" because it has a similar net result...but not in the traditional sense a choke.

Also, I would have to check, but I am pretty sure that my owners manual refers to it as a "fuel enrichener knob" or somesuch. Never noticed words on the handle...but ok, for the average person I guess it's a "choke".

Hope this clears it up.


Choke valve

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In automotive contexts, a choke valve is a valve that modifies the air pressure in the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, and thereby modifies the ratio of fuel and air quantity entering the engine. Choke valves are generally used in engines with carburetors, to supply a richer fuel mixture during engine start than at other times. Most choke valves in engines are actually butterfly valves that are mounted in the manifold above the carburetor jet, to produce a higher partial vacuum and thereby draw more fuel into the intake stream.
In heavy industrial or fluid engineering contexts, a choke valve is a particular design of valve that lifts up and down a solid cylinder (called a "plug" or "stem") which is placed around or inside another cylinder that has holes or slots. The design of a choke valve means fluids flowing through the cage are coming from all sides and that the streams of flow (through the holes or slots) collide with each other at the center of the cage cylinder, thereby dissipating the energy of the fluid through "flow impingement". The main advantage of choke valves is that they can be designed to be totally linear in their flow rate.
Choke valves (both senses) draw their names from choked flow: over a wide range of valve settings the flow through the valve can be understood by ignoring the viscosity of the fluid passing through the valve; the rate of flow is determined only by the ambient pressure on the upstream side of the valve.


A choke valve is sometimes installed in the carburetor of internal combustion engines. Its purpose is to restrict the flow of air, thereby enriching the fuel-air mixture while starting the engine. Depending on engine design and application, the valve can be activated manually by the operator of the engine (via a lever or pull handle) or automatically by a temperature-sensitive mechanism called an autochoke.

Choke valves are important for carbureted gasoline engines because small droplets of gasoline do not evaporate well within a cold engine. By restricting the flow of air into the throat of the carburetor, the choke valve raises the level of vacuum inside the throat, which causes a proportionally greater amount of fuel to be sucked out of the main jet and into the combustion chamber during cold-running operation. Once the engine is warm (from combustion), opening the choke valve restores the carburetor to normal operation, supplying fuel and air in the correct stoichiometric ratio for clean, efficient combustion.
Note that the term "choke" is applied to the carburetor's enrichment device even when it works by a totally different method. Commonly SU carburetors have "chokes" that work by lowering the fuel jet to a narrower part of the needle. Some others work by introducing an additional fuel route to the constant depression chamber.
Chokes were nearly universal in automobiles until fuel injection replaced carburetion in the late 1980s. Choke valves are still extremely common in other internal-combustion applications, including most small portable engines, motorcycles, small prop-powered airplanes, and carbureted marine engines.
 

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Fuel injected bikes do NOT have a manual choke. That is done automatically with the ECU.
Carb's bikes DO have a manual choke
 

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Fuel injected bikes do NOT have a manual choke. That is done automatically with the ECU.
Carb's bikes DO have a manual choke
Spike -

You're 100% correct - only the 1300's need a "choke" as they are carbureted.

However, Victorys are the ONLY exception that comes to memory. Every Victory that I've seen has a "Choke" that needs to be used nearly every time that bike is cold-started - and they're all EFI equipped and have been for as long as I can remember. Then maybe it's Victory's are all screwed-up.

Oh yeah - we are talking NORMAL EFI bikes here. Sorry, I guess that Victorys don't fall into the "normal" category after all.
 

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choke

Shadango: Spike set you straight about the choke on the 1300s. Now who was right and who was wrong about the manual choke on the 1300s?
 

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Shadango: Spike set you straight about the choke on the 1300s. Now who was right and who was wrong about the manual choke on the 1300s?
Ked -

As Elwray stated - on the VTX1300 the term is technically and "Enrichener". A "Choke" closes down the air flow thru the venturi area, creating a higher suction effect, thereby pulling additional fuel into the carb then into the engine.

The "enrichener" circuit allows more fuel to pass into the idle without the need to restrict in-coming air flow. Works kind of like the enrichener cycle on fuel injected engines where the ECM increases the dwell cycle to the injectors to allow a bit more fuel into the engine during cold start-ups.
 

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Joe, I've seen quite a few sport bikes that are EFI, but have a manual enricher. IMHO that defeats a big plus to having EFI over carb... I rented an 08 HD nightster when I first got my license when I was in Maryland and it was FANNNtastic to just start her up and go. Not have to worry about a choke/enricher/whatnot..

Also, in your above post I think you meant shadango, not elwray... this is my first post in this thread :mrgreen:
 

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Just as well you're not exactly choking your chicken when you're choking your chicken.:mrgreen:
 

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Elwray -

OOOPPPS. You're correct - I did mean Shadango. Must be I was thinking of you because of another post.

Thankfully I'm not heavy into the sportbike crowd and my exposure to them is limited to pre-2000 models except for tires and oil/filter changes - so my experience with EFI equipped sportbikes is nearly non-existent.

Full EFI bikes, like the VTX1800 and all H-D models are a dream to start as no fiddling with an "enrichener" is required.
 

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You are talking about fuel injected bikes right?[quote=Madness_MC;2127181]Ked -

As Elwray stated - on the VTX1300 the term is technically and "Enrichener". A "Choke" closes down the air flow thru the venturi area, creating a higher suction effect, thereby pulling additional fuel into the carb then into the engine.

The "enrichener" circuit allows more fuel to pass into the idle without the need to restrict in-coming air flow. Works kind of like the enrichener cycle on fuel injected engines where the ECM increases the dwell cycle to the injectors to allow a bit more fuel into the engine during cold start-ups.[/quote]
 

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Ked -

As Elwray stated - on the VTX1300 the term is technically and "Enrichener". A "Choke" closes down the air flow thru the venturi area, creating a higher suction effect, thereby pulling additional fuel into the carb then into the engine.

The "enrichener" circuit allows more fuel to pass into the idle without the need to restrict in-coming air flow. Works kind of like the enrichener cycle on fuel injected engines where the ECM increases the dwell cycle to the injectors to allow a bit more fuel into the engine during cold start-ups.
Thanks for clarifying that for some....I was accosted in a very rude PM over this silliness....you can probably guess by whom.
 

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You are talking about fuel injected bikes right?
NO

See ABRAMS original post

I have and 1800 and I was just wondering if the 1300 had a choke or not?
Last time I checked, my 1300 was not FI.

Note the definition he gives of choke....something that closes down airflow in the venturi area...If you have ever ripped a 1300 carb apart you would know we dont HAVE that.

We have a fuel enrichener circuit, as explained.

But you can call it a choke if'n ya wanna. ...That IS what the owners manual calls it. (Hence why I said "technically" in the post of mine that you jumped the hell all over.) Would have to check the service manual to see what they call it in there....not that I care that much to do so. Its easier to call it "choke" and I am sure that that is part of the reason Honda calls it that....so that people who dont know how a real choke really works wouldn't say "the what now?" when they said "fuel enrichener knob".

:p
 

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sooooo.... does the 1300VTX have a choke then? :roll::lol:
 

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The 1300s have a choke. The 1800s don't. End of discussion. In replying to shadango earlier posts. The average person would call it a choke. So what does that tell you about shadango.

Fuel injected bikes do NOT have a manual choke. That is done automatically with the ECU.
Carb's bikes DO have a manual choke
 

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The 1300s have a choke. The 1800s don't. End of discussion.
LOL :roll:

You win...you got the last word. :thumbup: Wrong last word, but ok.

Your pointing out what you think you are pointing out is very reminicent of another very annoying poster who loves to pick fights and pounce on every little thing.

Wonder if you are related?

What that tells me about YOU is that you have a very sad little world you live in, all by yourself. :-(

(See, I can re-edit posts to add stuff to....LOL) :popcorn:
 

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Semi-hijacking but.. I've heard some bikes have an "automatic release" for the choke or enricher?? As you ride it pulls itself in?

Or is this a case of something like too tight of a fitting that lets it work its way shut, and isn't actually automatic at all?
 

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Semi-hijacking but.. I've heard some bikes have an "automatic release" for the choke or enricher?? As you ride it pulls itself in?

Or is this a case of something like too tight of a fitting that lets it work its way shut, and isn't actually automatic at all?
You mean like a heat-activated kind of deal, like on an old car where the choke (actually a real choke in that case) is operated by a temperature controlled thermostat/spring gizmo?
 
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