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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When purchased my 1300R had a stock air filter and the stock pipes had been gutted. The plugs were more toward the rich side.

I installed a K&N air filter, new plugs, and a set of V&H bigshots.

The bike seems to idle OK but it has a vibration at the low to mid range power band. There is not popping or excessive noise when I let off. I am wondering if:

1. I have a bad plug
2. I need to rejet (I have read several posts where no jetting was done on a similar change)
3. The A/F is out.
4. All of the above.

Has anyone else experienced this??
 

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FPT2001 said:
When purchased my 1300R had a stock air filter and the stock pipes had been gutted. The plugs were more toward the rich side.

I installed a K&N air filter, new plugs, and a set of V&H bigshots.

The bike seems to idle OK but it has a vibration at the low to mid range power band. There is not popping or excessive noise when I let off. I am wondering if:

1. I have a bad plug
2. I need to rejet (I have read several posts where no jetting was done on a similar change)
3. The A/F is out.
4. All of the above.

Has anyone else experienced this??
Your vibration is likely a combination of several things. The engineering disaster that any single pin engine really is... (even though I love mine because it sounds good).. and the natural tendency of an engine to vibrate more when the RPM's are extremely low in comparison to the torque being created by the engine. Faster R's wouldn't really eliminate the vibration per say, but it'd speed their frequency which'd minimize the effect of how you feel it...
 

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For me the vibration is around 55 if you can believe the speedo, below or above smooth as the proverbial babies butt. :lol: Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks.

I figure the bike was so obnoxiously loud with the gutted stock pipes that I may have not noticed the vibration as much. Plus it is always possible to get a bad plug. I wanted to get a sanity check from others before I stopped worrying and started messing with something that, other than the slight vibration, runs prestty good.

I am going to ride a bit more, check the plugs, and then I will probably do the A/F adjustment. I may do the other mods this winter.
 

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Hey, I just checked through old threads but couldn't find it.... someone linked a tech story about how the VTX is purposely balanced imperfectly to give the bike some vibration. The short version as I recall, was that Harleys shook a lot and thought they may have shaken too much, the riders actually liked some shake 'cause it felt like they were riding a real beast. So most of honda's bikes were balanced just right, but people felt the ride was a little too tame, too reserved. not lacking horsepower, but just too refined. Riders actually liked the feel of the of center vibration, so they gave the VTX one. Maybe your ride is above and beyond this intentional vibration I think I know what I'm talking about, but maybe the vibration you feel is supposed to be there?

Hopefully someone else can find the thread. It started when someone asked what speeds people shift gears in, and then the thread started talking about lugging and how bad it was, and then some guy posted this tech link talking about true "lugging" and how it was next to impossible to do on a VTX and proceeded to talk about the intentional wobble. I found it really interesting, but I can't find it.... anybody?
 

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BOOYA, found it. I used to use the "google search" which BLEW!!! but I finally noticed the "search" right above it and wow, it actually works!!

slartibartfast said:


Excerpt: The cylinders of the VTX are splayed 52 degrees. The pins on the crankshaft are separated by 76 degrees. Do you (not you, D-Hav, but "you" the collective vibration/lugging-question-group) know why the cylinder angle of separation doesn't match the crank-pin angle of separation? Standard engineering practices would dictate that these two values would ALWAYS match if the usual goals of engine power and engine efficiency are the design objective. The reason they don’t match on the VTX is to CAUSE vibration. Read again: To GENERATE vibration in the motorcycle for the rider to feel. Honda's have long been criticized for being too refined, for having no "character". When Honda entered the real cruiser market (ie not the Magna/hot-rod series of bikes) to take on Harley, Honda’s top brass thought, “We'll make our bikes better than a Harley and people will buy them”. Guess what. In doing so, Honda made V-Twins so good, so smooth and versatile, that they lost the very mystique that was leading people to buy Harley; Honda’s engineers eliminated the little peculiarities and quirks that make Harleys fun to ride. The biggest one of these charismatic peculiarities is the vibration, the so-called "cadence" of the motor. Ride a Shadow 1100 sometime. Fantastic motorcycle in many regards (mine has 70K+ miles and has required no adjustments and no repairs). But Shadows are boring in that they are too refined. The engine feels...well....perfect…perfectly balanced (even though it is hard mounted to the frame, there is NO vibration to speak of; the mirrors are usable at 100mph and all speeds below). After experimenting around in the cruiser market for a number of years, Honda finally realized that a big reason people enjoy Harleys, and a big reason Harleys are so popular is because they feel (and sound) nostalgic, like riding something very old, and a big part of that feel is the slow, physical rhythm of the engine; the vibration. When Honda designed the VTX, they specifically, intentionally, made the engine shake. Yes, the engine has balance shafts to remove the high-frequency, annoying vibration, but the low-frequency, “lumpy” shake is there, ON PURPOSE, to remind you that you have locomotive-like 4 inch pistons between you’re legs, rising and falling like some huge antiquated factory machine, or a 1930’s farm implement.
 
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