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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
UPDATE: Based on the list of what to check, here is what I checked today and what the voltage showed:

With the multimeter set for 12 Volts, I first checked the battery voltage (battery was on charger for days):
  • with IGN OFF Voltage = 12.66
  • with IGN ON Voltage = 12.65
Pulled the headlight to access the red 9-pin connector & found one side of the bottom of the red connector has 3 wires (white wt thin black stripe, Black wt think black stripe, & all Black).

Voltage of White/BL = 12.47
Voltage of Black/W = 12.47

I pulled the ICM & disconnected it to test the Blue/Yel and Yel/Blue wire voltage. Both showed 11.14 Volts.

Last I tried testing the battery voltage when cranking/starting:

As soon as the starter is pushed the voltage dropped from 12.65 to 10. something. It wouldn't even crank once more. Seems like something is seriously draining the battery when its under load.

Any advice would be greatly appreciate!
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Sounds like time for a new battery. At the very least, pull it out and take it to an auto parts store that will run a load test on it.
It is a brand new battery. Putting in a new battery is the first thing I did to sadly learn it (reason for not starting) is something more complicated that I'm trying to discover/fix.
 

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YUASA says if battery voltage below 9.5 volts, the battery is weak.
Starter motors have not been a problem, batteries have been.
Brand new batteries can have issues.
What did you buy and what rated current???
You can jumper cable to a Non-running vehicle and see what happens voltage wise.
 

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It is a brand new battery. Putting in a new battery is the first thing I did to sadly learn it (reason for not starting) is something more complicated that I'm trying to discover/fix.
Yes, you told us this before. But you also said it only had enough uumph for 3 extended start attempts. This does not sound like a healthy battery to me, and hence the suggestion for a load test or a new one.
 

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What battery is in your other bike? There may be a chance it fits. Always verify polarity.
Some have different polarity and cables may not reach some battery posts...Caution..
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
YUASA says if battery voltage below 9.5 volts, the battery is weak.
Starter motors have not been a problem, batteries have been.
Brand new batteries can have issues.
What did you buy and what rated current???
You can jumper cable to a Non-running vehicle and see what happens voltage wise.
I purchased a Yuasa High Performance (AGM) battery. It is the exact replacement for the one that ran in it for at least 8 years. Again, per my first post, when I first put it in it started the bike after 2 tries. Yesterday the battery tested at 12.65 volts before I tried to start the bike, but it wouldn't crank over even once.

I can hook up my Harley battery as long as it will not be harmed with trying it.
 

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If the HD battery does not fit you can always make an extension with cable as large as existing cable or larger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
If the HD battery does not fit you can always make an extension with cable as large as existing cable or larger.
I actually have a portable Lithium battery jump starter I can use. This will do no harm, or is there some prescribed method to safely jump a motorcycle? :unsure: I recall something about grounding to the frame, rather than the battery (correct me if I'm wrong please).
 

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I'd check for parasitic draw. Sounds like the battery is dying just sitting there.
 

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It sounds like bad battery or coils. Batteries are known for being bad off the shelf especially if they are shipped. Its nothing to charge it then take it to auto parts store and have them load test it. Another thing to look at is your tender. Most new batteries need charged and this means your tender could be fouled and showing charged when in fact it isn't working. If you load check the battery after charging with a different tender I would then focus on coils. Its a pain but finding the thing that it isn't leads to finding the thing that it is. :{)
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
UPDATE:

Well, it just keeps getting better and better....(((sarcasm)))

I hooked up my Lithium Jump Start device (see image) to see if it would jump start the VTX. Note that this was jump starter was fully charged and has worked in the past to jump start my truck. I hooked the positive clamp to the battery positive, and the ground clamp of the charger was hooked to the bikes frame. The battery had been on a tender for the last few weeks.

The bike cranked over once. I pressed the starter again and it cranked once more. I pushed the starter again and it fried the charger. The thing actually bulged, and a wisp of smoke came up off the positive connection. The Jump Starter is now dead/trash.

Harkon suggested checking for parasitic draw:

I did this a few weeks ago: Used multimeter to check for parasitic draw; Shows .006-7 mA. Manual spec is less than 2 ma (2 milliamps or .002 amp).


I would think we can now rule out a bad battery as the reason my bike will not start. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.




Font Electronic device Cable Machine Tool
 

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Take the starter motor to a starter motor/alternator/generator shop.
Back a few years ago these Lithium Jump boxes were hot items.
They said they could crank v8 engines.
I never bought one. If they had 10AWG or so 30 amps would be the max in my book.

A jump from a not running vehicle would have been a better choice.
Parasitic load would take some time to discharge a good battery.
Nothing was smoking, starter motor most likely the problem.
You can take a look into the unit. Smell the wiring, it may provide
a clue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Take the starter motor to a starter motor/alternator/generator shop.
Back a few years ago these Lithium Jump boxes were hot items.
They said they could crank v8 engines.
I never bought one. If they had 10AWG or so 30 amps would be the max in my book.
Sorry, but I have no idea what you're trying to say in the above concerning the Lithium Jump box. They work in my experience, specifically the one I just fried, having jumped two vehicles with it in the past. They are known to jump multiple vehicles in a row on a single charge.

A jump from a not running vehicle would have been a better choice.
To the above I just have to wonder why? This experiment fried my jump box, so I'm very glad I didn't try starting the bike with my Harley battery!

Parasitic load would take some time to discharge a good battery.
Nothing was smoking, starter motor most likely the problem.
You can take a look into the unit. Smell the wiring, it may provide
a clue.
In terms of a parasitic draw, this battery has been on a charger for weeks each time I've tried to start with it over the last few weeks. Last week this battery showed 12.65 volts when I tested it. Seems like with the battery at 12.65 and not starting with a jump starter, we can rule out the battery, do you agree?

Any idea why my Jump Starter was fried? Would a bad starter do that??? There was as wisp of smoke BTW, that seemed to be rising from the positive terminal just after the jump starter fried.

I suppose I'll be pulling the starter then. Will report back.....UGH! 💩
 
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My take: If your starter has an internal short, then it draws very high amperage. By using a lithium jump pack (which has VERY low internal resistance), the presumably shorted starter was able to draw so much current from the lithium jump pack that the high current / high heat damaged it. A traditional lead-acid battery has much higher internal resistance than a lithium pack, so it would have been much less likely to have an ultra high amperage discharge (and associated heat damage) if connected to the failed starter. Good luck on getting the starter tested and fixed. At least you are making progress, even if it is aggravating and slow.
 
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