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Discussion Starter #1
I have been out of town, so my bike has been sitting for about a week. I changed my spark plugs today as you may have seenin another thread. I started the bike tonight to go for a ride and I had smoke coming up between my legs. I shut down and looked and I had oil dripping from the point where the exhaust connected to the rear of the engine. It was not pouring out but there was a large drop of oil on the engine right where the pipe connects. The only thing I had done recently that I could think has anything to do with this is I changed the oil last week before I left. I went for a ride after the change and everything seemed ok.

So, to the experts, what broke or what should I check?
 

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If I had to chance a guess, I would say it is the rear head, head cover leaking. They have been known to do this. There is no gasket there, only Hondabond.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
where's the oil

I removed the rear exhaust today. I do not see evidence of oil leaking from above the exhaust port but there is oil on the bottom of the exhaust port. ( I can upload pics if needed)

My question is, can I run the bike for a short time (a few seconds) without the exhaust connected to see if oil is coming from the port or somewhere else?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
pic

The oil is dripping (very slowly) from the bottom of the exhaust port. I do not see any oil above the exhaust port.
Also the pipe for the rear port has an oily film when looking in from the rear and the front pipe is bone dry.

 

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One easy way to find an oil leak that is tough to spot is to clean the surrounding area with contact cleaner, as it leaves no residue.
Then from your local walmart or drugstore, get a spray can of desinex spray foot powder, and spray all around where you think the oil leak might be, allow the spray to dry, and it will leave a white powder all over the area, now run the engine for a little bit, and if there is oil leaking anywhere, you will see it without problem.

This is a great technique for finding mystery oil leaks. Have used it many times.
The foot powder washes away easily and doesnt hurt any painted surfaces.
 

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I removed the rear exhaust today. I do not see evidence of oil leaking from above the exhaust port but there is oil on the bottom of the exhaust port. ( I can upload pics if needed)

My question is, can I run the bike for a short time (a few seconds) without the exhaust connected to see if oil is coming from the port or somewhere else?
First of all, NO, do not run the bike without any type of header pipe on the exhaust port. What tvnl suggested is a good idea if you think the oil is coming from from someplace other than the cylinder. To know if the oil is coming from the rear cylinder you will have to clean the exhaust port, and the pipe, reassemble, and take it for a ride. I know it's a lot of work but, really no other way to be sure. Unless you have access to a borescope. With a borescope you can examine the condition of the cylinder by removing a sparkplug and inserting the scope. Any scoring (vertical scratches/grooves) in the cylinder will allow oil to bypass the rings.
 

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See all that oil on the fins behind and above the exhaust port? That's probably coming from the valve cover and running down under the exhaust flange. This valve cover leak is common, but usually shows up on the left side of the rear cylinder.
If it is coming from the exhaust, it would be coming out the pipe and would indicate a leaking valve stem seal and worn valve guide. Is the end of the rear exhaust oily?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Here is a pic of the exhaust tips. The top one is the rear. I hope you can see this but the top one is oily and the bottom is dry.
 

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Here's the thing, when oil is making to the combustion chamber through the valve/valve giude (whether that's cause the clearance is to great, or the seal is shot) it only comes in during intake, when the cylinder is in vacuum. So, that oil vapor gets compressed along with the fuel/air mixture on the compression stroke and blam-O, it lights off on power. Rarely wet stacks or fouls plugs because it enters at such a slight rate. This is why the old Chevys with the crap guide seals would puff blue when you first started them, then clear. But, if a cylinder is scored, it's gonna throw some oil out on every exhaust stroke. I hope stlspd's cylinder is not scored but, if it's wet stacking the rear pipe it's time for a compression test.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
well this is really good news ... NOT!:banghead:

Ok so what are my next steps or my options here? I am going to search on doing a compression test as I have never done it before and really don't know what I am looking for. But any guidance or educated avice would be great.
 

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A compression test is a very simple thing to do, although you do need a 'compression tester' which is simply (for gasoline engines) a zero to 250 psi pressure gauge attached via a hose to a threaded adapter that goes into the spark plug hole. Small engine shops even have less expensive ones where the gauge is attached to a cone shaped rubber plug that you hold firmly in the spark plug hole while someone cranks the engine. You would take one spark plug out of each cylinder (but take all four plug wires off and isolate them) and connect the gauge to the rear cylinder. Crank the engine until the gauge stops rising (usually only takes a couple of revolutions) and write that reading down. Than repeat the process on the front cylinder. If the rear cylinder is damged it's reading will be signifigantly lower than the front cylinder. If memory serves the maual says they should be around 90 psi. I will double check that and get back to you. Don't get to worried yet. Stay calm and think things through. Service manual says 95psi.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I have a pressure gauge, where do I get this adapter?
 

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Here's the thing, when oil is making to the combustion chamber through the valve/valve giude (whether that's cause the clearance is to great, or the seal is shot) it only comes in during intake, when the cylinder is in vacuum. So, that oil vapor gets compressed along with the fuel/air mixture on the compression stroke and blam-O, it lights off on power. Rarely wet stacks or fouls plugs because it enters at such a slight rate. This is why the old Chevys with the crap guide seals would puff blue when you first started them, then clear. But, if a cylinder is scored, it's gonna throw some oil out on every exhaust stroke. I hope stlspd's cylinder is not scored but, if it's wet stacking the rear pipe it's time for a compression test.
Good point. Broken ring(s) would cause it too.

A compression test is a very simple thing to do, although you do need a 'compression tester' which is simply (for gasoline engines) a zero to 250 psi pressure gauge attached via a hose to a threaded adapter that goes into the spark plug hole. Small engine shops even have less expensive ones where the gauge is attached to a cone shaped rubber plug that you hold firmly in the spark plug hole while someone cranks the engine. You would take one spark plug out of each cylinder (but take all four plug wires off and isolate them) and connect the gauge to the rear cylinder. Crank the engine until the gauge stops rising (usually only takes a couple of revolutions) and write that reading down. Than repeat the process on the front cylinder. If the rear cylinder is damged it's reading will be signifigantly lower than the front cylinder. If memory serves the maual says they should be around 90 psi. I will double check that and get back to you. Don't get to worried yet. Stay calm and think things through. Service manual says 95psi.
Per manual, if you unplug the P3 connector to the fuel pump, you can leave the plug wires on.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
What is the recommended procedure for using the seafoam please? I have some sitting on the shelf.
 

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What is the recommended procedure for using the seafoam please? I have some sitting on the shelf.

read the instructions on the jar....secondly...maybe its just me...looks like the rear jug is simply not firing:dontknow: how much oil did you put in it???you stated you just changed it...then you noticed all these problems...

at 10k miles....should not have valve problems..to me anyway...your the second owner huh..looks like this bike has been neglected by first owner..

take right side cover off and seat,,check for any loose connections..

what plugs did you put in???

is the an aftermarket power commander on the bike??

by the way...welcome aboard...8)
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Checked compression today and I am getting about 104 psi on the rear cylinder. I re-checked the oil level for the 3rd time and I am betweem 1/8 and 1/16 inch below the top fill line on the stick with the bike standing level.

I am going to replace the exhaust gaskets and put on my new/used stock exhaust I just picked up. I am going to go back and check the grounds and the coil connections again to make sure nothing was missed.

I am also going to run some techron fuel cleaner through it.

I hope that within the next couple days this turns out to be just a fluke thing and have the kick stand up and wheels turning.:doorag:
 
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