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I have 24000 miles on my current set of brakes. They seem to be weak and they skretch at times. I already ordered new pads but should they be worn out that fast ? 24000 miles ! Then theres the price for these pads ! What the hell are they thinking (Honda )? I ordered mine from J & P Cycles for less. Do I have to remove the tire to install or can I somehow pull this off otherwise ? I don't have a bike jack and I just gave my buddies back, which I had here for over a year. I hate to ask for it back. He will probably wonder if it will be another year.
 

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wgnagey said:
I have 24000 miles on my current set of brakes. They seem to be weak and they skretch at times. I already ordered new pads but should they be worn out that fast ? 24000 miles ! Then theres the price for these pads ! What the hell are they thinking (Honda )? I ordered mine from J & P Cycles for less. Do I have to remove the tire to install or can I somehow pull this off otherwise ? I don't have a bike jack and I just gave my buddies back, which I had here for over a year. I hate to ask for it back. He will probably wonder if it will be another year.
The pad life is determined by the type of riding you do and how you slow down or brake.

My VTX has 17K miles on it and is already due for rear pads. I checked the pads at 12k when I bought the bike and they were getting very close to needing replacing. The previous owner did a lot of twistie riding. Most of my riding is two up so I got another 6k miles out of the pads. Shifting down to slow down will help save the pads but I don't do that very often in order to save working the drive train too hard.

I ordered after market pads for nearly half the price of OEM and they are rated the same as OEM.

I pulled my rear pads off to check them and had them back together in less than 10 minutes and that included searching for the darn misplaced allen wrench. When I replace the pads I'm going to bleed the brakes at the same time so it will be easy to push the brake cylinder back in far enough to get clearance for the new pads. It's also time to give the brake system a fluid change.

You do not need a jack and you do not have to remove the wheels to just replace the pads. Do a search and you will find plenty of information on how to change the pads.

If you don't already have a shop manual, it is well worth the investment to get one.

Good luck.
Jack
 

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+1. Almost 18k on mine and one of the rear pads is very worn. its mate one the other side of the rotor looks fine. Go figure. I am putting aftermaket pads on tomorrow before a jaunt up to northern Colorado.
 

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JD9613 said:
+1. Almost 18k on mine and one of the rear pads is very worn. its mate one the other side of the rotor looks fine. Go figure. I am putting aftermaket pads on tomorrow before a jaunt up to northern Colorado.
It sounds like something is not moving as it should to center the caliper on the brake rotor if the pads aren't wearing about the same on both sides. Check the main caliper pin bolt the caliper slides on to make sure it slides free and smooth. A little silicone grease is recommemded inside the rubber boot that the pin bolt goes through. My pads are worn about the same on both sides.

Jack
 

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Agreed with what all have said. As all those disclaimers say, actual mileage may vary ... but 24K doesn't sound too awful bad.

Removing pads is fairly painless. On each caliper there's a flat black rubber cap; this is the pin pin plug. Remove that, then remove the pad pin with a 5 mm hex wrench. If it's never been out, it could be tight at first. Slide the pads out. You may need to press the caliper against the rotor to compress the pistons enough to remove the pads.

Before reassembling, grab a packet of brake lubricant from any auto parts store (less than $2), and spread a dab on the pad pin to ensure that the pads slide freely. Also, while the pads are out, slide the caliper in and out to make sure it moves freely on its mounting pins. 99% of the time it will move fine, but the pads still wear unevenly. I wouldn't worry, I've never seen any two in a pair wear exactly the same. I don't claim to be any kind of an expert, but I've replaced a few pads in bikes and cars in my day, and one pad always wears faster than the other.

Anyway ... to replace the pads, slide the new pads in so that the pin holes on the pads line up with the pin holes in the caliper. I found it easier to slide the piston side pad in first, then start threading in the pin enough to hold that pad in place while inserting the inside pad. You'll need to hold some pressure on the pads against the spring up in the caliper to get them to line up. Once they're both in place, finish threading in the pad pin and tighten to 13 lb-ft.
 

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Apache, thanks. You give the same advice a friend did. Will clean and lubricate everything with fresh pads installed. Peace of mind. :)
 

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JD9613 said:
Apache, thanks. You give the same advice a friend did. Will clean and lubricate everything with fresh pads installed. Peace of mind. :)
You're welcome.

Best wishes,
Jack
 

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I'm due for new pads at 9,000..... Having a passenger on the back doesnt help....
 

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Got 26K miles on the X and will be installing the 3rd set of pads this weekend. So what 'they' say is true...your mileage may vary! Don't forget that new pads will probably take some miles to function properly. So don't get caught off guard. I would suggest you take the time to "bed" the new pads. If your bike won't go, that is one thing. If it will not turn or stop...

Mark
 

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edc1800 said:
Agreed with what all have said. As all those disclaimers say, actual mileage may vary ... but 24K doesn't sound too awful bad.

Removing pads is fairly painless. On each caliper there's a flat black rubber cap; this is the pin pin plug. Remove that, then remove the pad pin with a 5 mm hex wrench. If it's never been out, it could be tight at first. Slide the pads out. You may need to press the caliper against the rotor to compress the pistons enough to remove the pads.

Before reassembling, grab a packet of brake lubricant from any auto parts store (less than $2), and spread a dab on the pad pin to ensure that the pads slide freely. Also, while the pads are out, slide the caliper in and out to make sure it moves freely on its mounting pins. 99% of the time it will move fine, but the pads still wear unevenly. I wouldn't worry, I've never seen any two in a pair wear exactly the same. I don't claim to be any kind of an expert, but I've replaced a few pads in bikes and cars in my day, and one pad always wears faster than the other.

Anyway ... to replace the pads, slide the new pads in so that the pin holes on the pads line up with the pin holes in the caliper. I found it easier to slide the piston side pad in first, then start threading in the pin enough to hold that pad in place while inserting the inside pad. You'll need to hold some pressure on the pads against the spring up in the caliper to get them to line up. Once they're both in place, finish threading in the pad pin and tighten to 13 lb-ft.
...apply a thin coat of synthetic disc brake lube (not grease) to the contact points on the pad backing edges and to the back of the pads. Helps keep them moving and prevent squealing. No, it won't melt and contaminate the pads.
 
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