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Great link. Thank you :thumbup:
 

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Rider Safety Tips

Basic Motorcycle Safety Tips from the VTXOA
Safe Driving Requires the Effective Management of Risk
revised October 2012 0/`j~0

1. A ‘T-CLOCS’ pre-ride inspection should be conducted and protective clothing and helmet donned prior to any ride, irrespective of the length of the drive.

2. Dress for the fall, as well as the ride. Wear safety gear, including a Snell or DOT helmet (full face is best), eye protection, ear plugs to dampen not eliminate noise, gloves, and over-the-ankle boots. Protect the thorax: chest protector; back/spine pad; kidney belt. Consider a mouth guard to avoid concussions and pads to protect the forearms, wrists and knees.

3. Never take your eyes off the road. To Search, Evaluate, Execute (SEE) is to prowl, a level of heightened awareness and focus that teaches you to hunt for danger and look into corners and between things for possible risk. Prowling, which can be tiring, is to sit up and forward and actively search for obstacles, hazards and perils.

4. a. Look at the front wheel of a vehicle to determine the driver’s intent and starting motion.
b. Driver head movements and mirror checks often signal (sudden) lane changing.

5. Master control of the Friction Zone, the (Rear) Controlling Brake and use of the Head and Eyes. Regularly practice emergency stopping, parade walk, and tight-turn maneuvering (head turn + rear brake + clutch).

6. Proper engine gear & speed increases stability & control. Increase your reaction time in foul weather & areas of caution (bridges, gratings). Complete all slowing before turns, blind spots, wooded or congested areas.

7. In panic situations riders tend to fixate on objects they are trying to avoid (target-fixation). Since the bike goes where you are looking, concentrate (fixate) on braking or driving to a spot or safe place on or off the road.

8. High speed braking is 85% front brake, 15% rear; slow speed, is 15% front, 85% rear. In emergencies, apply both brakes, rear first (forks compress, rider’s weight shifts forward) then squeeze the front brake hard to a tapered stop. Pulling in the clutch aids slowing and often can be done in emergencies, whereas engine-downshifting is typically not practical. Avoid target-fixation. Never aggressively use the rear brake!

9. Cover the clutch and handbrake with four fingers as often as practicable (habits vary):
a. Higher speeds: cover the clutch (LH) and brake (RH) with 4-2 fingers; right foot near brake.
b. Moderate speeds: cover both with 2-4 fingers; thumb on or near horn; right foot near brake.
c. Slower speeds and Wooded, Congested or Blind areas: LH on grip, thumb on or by the horn; RH, 2-4 fingers cover the brake; lower gear, right foot on or near the foot brake.
d. Slow speeds (parking lots, gas stations, parade drive): do not cover front brake; use rear brake only.
e. Surmounting road obstacles: Do not cover the clutch or the front brake.

10. Slow maneuver control: regulate the friction zone, keep head and eyes up, and increase stability by increasing throttle while rear braking; like a gyroscope, bike stands up when the rear wheel turns. For tighter turns at slower speeds dip the front tire slightly in the opposite direction and then turn as intended.

11. Lane Positioning is a critical safety skill that requires (aggressive) physical and psychological control of the lane. Use Lane Positioning to defend your space and deter entry into it from the front, back and sides. Each lane consists of a left, middle and right portion; to control the lane slide left or right and slow down or speed up to close gaps, avoid obstacles, be seen, or improve visibility. Cars view through windshield and side mirrors.

a. In general, the left third of the lane offers the best view of the road ahead and oncoming traffic, highest visibility to others, most maneuverability, and least contact with road debris.
b. Best protection from left-turning vehicles: left/right third of lane, close gap with vehicle in front.
c. Best protection at intersections: no rabbit starts; close gaps, cross with other vehicle to side of risk.
d. HOV or far left lane: right third of lane offers highest visibility to drivers on the right.
e. Multi-lane highway: right third of passing (“hammer”) lane offers highest visibility.
f. To avoid the blind spots of an adjacent driver: stay behind or in-front of the line of their bumper.
g. To avoid erratic drivers: block with other vehicles, drop back, accelerate, or switch lanes.
h. Block gaps and deter entrance to lane (either side) by trailing vehicle’s rear corner on side facing traffic.
i. Follow other vehicles under the 2-second (under 50 mph) or 4-second (50+ mph) rule.
j. On group rides, stagger riders; each owns the width of their lane (12 feet).
k. Lane splitting: safest under 30 mph, between lanes #1 and #2, at no more than 10 mph above traffic speed.

12. Delayed- or Late-apexing: safest method for navigating the outside or inside bend (apex) of a curve; best line of sight through the corner. Watch the inside arc of the turn, sighting between mirror and windshield.

13. “Ride your Own Ride”; never let others determine your own level of comfort with speed, risk and danger.

14. Never ride when you’ve been drinking or when you’re tired or tense, angry or distracted. Stay focused yet relaxed, with elbows bent; always “prowl”. Shake off tension, take frequent breaks and hydrate often.

15. Look over the windshield; this allows for a clear, uninterrupted scan of the road.

16. Check air pressure weekly or every two weeks, and lights, oil, and tires before each ride.

17. Step off the bike to refuel. Eye-ball tires and check for leaks and loose fittings.

18. Always keep both feet on the pegs or boards unless stopped; if standing, keep left foot down, right foot on rear brake or both feet on the ground, toes turned out or in (pigeon-stance) for greater stability.

19. Most accidents occur at intersections and by left-turning vehicles. Whenever possible, flank cars while crossing intersections. To avoid gaps trail vehicle’s rear corner on side (either) facing traffic. If a driver’s intent is unclear, beep your horn; never flick your lights as some will interpret this as a signal to “proceed”.

20. Drive as if you are invisible to others. Bright colors, extra lights, flags, florescent vests and bands highly increase your visibility and thereby reduce your risk. Lots of chrome (and loud pipes) helps too!

21. Always do a head-check when changing lanes. Turn signals communicate intent and increase visibility.

22. Driver and rider vision is poorest at dawn and at dusk as eyes adjust from black and white vision to color (or back). Drunk driver risk doubles between 11 pm and 2 am and on weekends. Wear reflective gear!

23. The best defense against deer and dogs is controlled steering and braking, use of the horn, and avoiding target-fixation. In wooded and congested areas slow down, be in the proper gear, cover the rear brake, be prepared to swerve or stop and try to drive with your thumb over or near the horn.

24. Check your mirrors. Do it every time you change lanes, slow down or stop. Be ready to swerve or change lanes if another vehicle moves to occupy the gap you sought. Gaps & merge points pose the highest danger.

25. At stop signs and lights keep your bike’s nose angled toward an out (when behind cars), your bike in 1st gear and your eye on the mirror until the car behind you slows to a stop. Be prepared to move and fast!

26. Come to a full stop at each stop sign or red light; put left foot down, look, then drive.

27. Always have an escape route. Continually ask yourself how you might take evasive action if the un-expected happened: What if the car behind me doesn’t brake in time? What if debris falls off the truck up ahead? What if a deer flushes out from those trees at the bend? Is my right lane clear if he merges?

28. Inclement Weather
a. Slow down, brake early and greatly reduce lean angles in inclement weather; stay visible and stop often.
b. Rain brings oil up on road surfaces and grit at corners and bends; let oil wash out before riding.
c. Fog saps body heat, reduces visibility, muffles sounds and wets roads making the surfaces dangerous.
d. Wet leaves, metal covers, gratings, road markings and road snakes (tar patches) are very slippery.
e. Oncoming trucks, bridges & open fields pose risk of wind gusts; slow early, stay relaxed, power through.
f. Dress in layers: use polyester/synthetic (not cotton) as base layer; wind resistant outerwear.
g. Each year, lightening kills bikers; pull over, wait 30 minutes after the last rumble of thunder.
h. If you hydro-plane, do not hit the brakes; ride it out and keep it straight.

Other safety reads can be found on: http://www.msgroup.org/Articles.aspx?Cat=6
 

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Good advice and always good to review. Thanks for posting.
 

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Well...

Thanks for the info but, I did find some of the statements contradictory:dontknow:

Basic MC Rider Safety Tips from the VTXOA Members
(Safe Driving Requires Managing Risk)

1. Never (ever) take your eyes off the road in front of you.

2. Search, Evaluate, Execute (SEE), means prowling. Prowling is sitting up and forward and actively searching for obstacles, hazards and perils.

6. a. Look at the front wheel of a vehicle to determine the driver’s intent and starting motion.

14. Always do a head-check when changing lanes.

20. Check your mirrors. Do it every time you change lanes, slow down or stop.

23. Watch the inside arc of the curve. Slow or brake fully before curves, then accelerate through them.
Just saying:dontknow: Points well taken though:thumbup:
 

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One thing I just discovered today while riding here in Richmond - there's a ton of sand on the roads left over from snow days, and there's enough of it that it made some of my riding a little treacherous when turning. I get very nervous when that tire is running over a big sand spot in the middle of a turn. So for you guys who live in snow country, keep an eye out for that.

Rockroll
 

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Great reminder, thanks for the post. I took the beginners MSF course in May and purchased my 1st bike in August. I read the MSF book twice through before picking it up. It's amazing how fast you forget things, especially at my age:D
 

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Ear plugs = lowered awareness?

This is one of the best/comprehensive lists of safety tips I've seen, but I have to take exception to the tip of using ear plugs, or at least think it should be expanded. I recently had a close call from an emergency vehicle coming into the intersection I was entering on my green light and because the intersection was at the top of a hill and the emergency vehicle was approaching at a right angle from the bottom of the hill the siren sounded very far away when it was actually just coming into my path.

I understand that earplugs can reduce fatigue on long rides (especially if you have loud pipes) and riders can concentrate better without excess noise, however I would strongly advise wearing ear plugs in the inner city or where there is a risk of crossing the path of an
*emergency vehicle who is relying on your hearing them. Many full face helmets block much of the sound and with heavy-duty ear plug in on top of that I could see where the lack of hearing could be dangerous for inner city rides.

If my bike is making strange sounds I want to hear it, and if somebody honks at me I also want to hear it. My point being if you wear earplugs
make sure you can still hear emergency warnings.


Here is a great link to everything you might want to know about earplugs for motorcycle riding:

http://www.webbikeworld.com/Earplugs/earplugs.htm





From the California vehicle laws:
http://www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/vctop/d12/vc27400.htm

27400
. No person operating any motor vehicle or bicycle shall wear any headset covering, or any earplugs in, both ears. The prohibition of this section does not apply to any of the following:

(a) Persons operating authorized emergency vehicles, as defined in Section 165.
(b) Any person engaged in the operation of either special construction equipment or equipment for use in the maintenance of any highway.
(c) Any person engaged in the operation of refuse collection equipment who is wearing a safety headset or safety earplugs.
(d) Any person wearing personal hearing protectors in the form of custom earplugs or molds that are designed to attenuate injurious noise levels. The custom plugs or molds shall be designed in a manner so as to not inhibit the wearer's ability to hear a siren or horn from an emergency vehicle or a horn from another motor vehicle.

(e) Any person using a prosthetic device which aids the hard of hearing.
 

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Have you ever worn GOOD ear plugs, sets that are made by an audiologist? I have and you can hear everything BETTER with them in. The plugs block all the wind buffeting of your ear drums, so all you hear is vehicles, your buddy next to you talking to you, kids laughing in the park, etc....
 

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No. . .

Have you ever worn GOOD ear plugs, sets that are made by an audiologist? I have and you can hear everything BETTER with them in. The plugs block all the wind buffeting of your ear drums, so all you hear is vehicles, your buddy next to you talking to you, kids laughing in the park, etc....


No, but I'm curious how many arm$ and leg$ it might cost for the luxury.
;)


I once owned some shooting ear plugs that were supposed to only block out dangerous levels of sound and still allow in conversation level sounds. They hurt to wear with a helmet though.
:dontknow:
 

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About $35 a set last time I got them made for me. Once you sit for a mold, my audiologist gave me my cast so if I need new ones I just send my cast into the labs to have new sets made.

You should tell your audiologist that you want to wear them under a helmet. I have 2 sets, 1 for without a helmet(larger that stick out of the ear canal a little bit. 1 for under helmet(these sit flush with the skull so the helmet will not push them farther into the canal )

I use them for mowing the lawn and using the snow blower now too.
 

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About $35 a set last time I got them made for me. Once you sit for a mold, my audiologist gave me my cast so if I need new ones I just send my cast into the labs to have new sets made.

You should tell your audiologist that you want to wear them under a helmet. I have 2 sets, 1 for without a helmet(larger that stick out of the ear canal a little bit. 1 for under helmet(these sit flush with the skull so the helmet will not push them farther into the canal )

I use them for mowing the lawn and using the snow blower now too.

Thanks for the details. I'm amazed :shock: at the low cost, really.

I have excellent insurance and I can't even visit my dentist without being charged a co-pay. To go to any specialist I would need to pay for a doctor visit (co-pay) then get a referral to the audiologist, and would likely have to pay for all costs to that doctor out of pocket as I doubt these are covered in my insurance. :banghead:



 

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I think it's a good point, House.

Most earplugs are the arrow insert kind, so you can adjust how deeply, and therefore how fully, the noise is blocked.

None-the-less, a good point. Full face riders often do not need earplugs.

Again, thanks for the input. I'll fix the list when I get a chance :thumbup:
 

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Thanks for the ear plug link!

House "o" Pain, Thanks for providing that link to the ear plug reviews.
Best info I got today. 8)
 
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