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Discussion Starter #1

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How else you gonna get all dem inner city hoop playas?
 
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How else you gonna get all dem inner city hoop playas?
What is the purpose of the bolded part of your post? Actually, what was the purpose of your post at all?
I can't answer for Ranger, but I'll tell you what I see, as do you.
We both know there are minorities admitted to colleges that have no business being there. Not all, but I'll bet it's a preponderance of students.

Aside from tuition, where do colleges make their money? Sports.
B Ball & F Ball. I don't know how old you are, but I can remember seeing a cartoon of a Football player on stage, getting his degree in Basket Weaving. It's the same now.

College scouts see a high school kid that's good on the court, even though he tests at a 6th grade level, they'll recruit him.

Is that fair to the kid? That's a discussion for another time.

As far as the bolding, we both know that's how the subculture speaks.
Except these days, you have to add several F bombs into the conversation.

In an office bldg I worked in, the only place you could smoke was a small area where the bldg Post Office was.
If you walked through 1 set of doors you were in the loading dock, if you walked through the other you were in the bldg lobby. Both sets of doors were solid.

I can attest personally, some Black lawyers from a very prestigious firm in the area, smoking between those sets of doors, if you closed your eyes, you'd swear you were on the corner in the ghetto. MF bombs, F bombs, etc.

These are Lawyers, not some hood off the street.

OTOH, maybe they were just "Keepin' It Real".

TBL is people should be raised up, not lowering requirements for the purpose of inclusion.
 

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Lowering standards for some is not helpful for anyone, including the some.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Lowering standards for some is not helpful for anyone, including the some.
True!
But the question is, how do we ''bring up'' the ppl who are lagging.
There are some, of every race, that are just not suited for college. (I'm one of them).

There are numerous facets that all have to be overcome for ''The Some" to succeed.

Edit to add

Each person should be able to attain they're maximum potential.
 

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“Each person should be able to attain they're maximum potential. “

LOL. That’s the kind of sentence that will help you get into Rutgers. :D

But, in a more serious sense, where is the outrage at the obvious racism being displayed by this policy announcement from Rutgers? What they are really saying is “to curry favor from BLM whiners, and since we don’t think black people are smart enough to learn and apply the standard rules of English, we are no longer going to emphasize clear communication as part of our curriculum”.

No one who seeks an actual education should even consider attending there.
 

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What is the purpose of the bolded part of your post? Actually, what was the purpose of your post at all?
First, I wasn't the one who BOLDENED the print. Second, whats the QPA of the Rutgers hoops team as compared to say Stanford? That speaks for itself. The dumbing down of American education.
 

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First, I wasn't the one who BOLDENED the print. Second, whats the QPA of the Rutgers hoops team as compared to say Stanford? That speaks for itself. The dumbing down of American education.
I bolded the text to ask you the purpose of using Ebonics. What was the point? If you wanted to make a point about the lowering of standards, was there a need to use that language? To me it just seems a little bit racist. But apparently I'm the only one who sees that.

There are what 15 student in the Basketball program, way to sum up a school with almost 70k students to 15 that of athletes.

Rutgers is the State University of NJ. How often do you compare state GPA levels to a leading private university? Also, your point makes no sense, every university has different standards for athletes than the rest of their students. The reason why? The athletes make more money for the school than the school spends on them (when you average total money in over all athletes, smoothing the football program across all sports).

My wife is a graduate of Rutgers, she did an accelerated Nursing Bachelors of Science program (for students who already have a bachelors degree). She now has her masters in Nursing and is a Nurse Practitioner. Making her a Black woman with 2 undergraduate degrees, and a masters. Rutgers sure is a terrible school...

What university did you graduate from, and what was your degree in?
 

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First, congrats to you and your wife overcoming adversity and becoming pinnacles of your community. I graduated from the school of hard knocks, and the U.S. Military, so my 'white privilege' had nothing to do with anything. My eyes are wide open, and many many times a school reaps the benefit and support of others due to the success of their sports teams, including PSU, and also many times it is because of bringing in minority players from Juco's and transfers, and then they graduate with degrees in Art appreciation 101, (fingerpainting), Sports management 101 (handing out tickets & flyers at games), and things like that. Don't pretend this doesn't happen. PUBLIC -or- PRIVATE. Thats the system.
 
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So, we're easing the score. Why? Assuming we are lowering it for EVERYBODY there won't be a relative change in how many people of any kind of 'minority' will pass.

Damn it, I wish I had never paid attention in school because then I would not be burdened by questions like this.
🤢

But then again, I'd be begging for a part time job at MacDonald's instead of voluntarily retiring two years ago at the age of 67.
😎
 

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Henk, stop throwing more common sense crap into the game.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
My wife is a graduate of Rutgers, she did an accelerated Nursing Bachelors of Science program (for students who already have a bachelors degree). She now has her masters in Nursing and is a Nurse Practitioner. Making her a Black woman with 2 undergraduate degrees, and a masters. Rutgers sure is a terrible school...
I'm going to assume both you and your wife, are not twenty-somethings, and went through college without all this "Lowering Of The Bar" stuff.

I don't remember if you specified what you do for a living, but I got the idea you're a professional person.

So I'd like to ask...
How do you & your wife feel, after accomplishing what you both did, seeing the bar lowered, allowing persons who perhaps don't have the mental wherewithal you both have, to attain the same degrees your wife, (And, I'm assuming yourself), have?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
So, we're easing the score. Why? Assuming we are lowering it for EVERYBODY there won't be a relative change in how many people of any kind of 'minority' will pass.

Damn it, I wish I had never paid attention in school because then I would not be burdened by questions like this.
🤢

But then again, I'd be begging for a part time job at MacDonald's instead of voluntarily retiring two years ago at the age of 67.
😎
I guess I'm mistaken.
I would have sworn you were already spoken to about
using common sense and logic on this board.

You know how it screws up the Libs Fantasy World.
Please, show a little compassion.
 

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I'm going to assume both you and your wife, are not twenty-somethings, and went through college without all this "Lowering Of The Bar" stuff.
I will answer this below.

I don't remember if you specified what you do for a living, but I got the idea you're a professional person.
I am a software engineer with a masters in Health Administration (essentially an MBA that has a healthcare operational focus). I do healthcare data analytics in healthcare quality. I specialize in managing, reporting, analyzing and presenting healthcare datasets.

I'm going to assume both you and your wife, are not twenty-somethings, and went through college without all this "Lowering Of The Bar" stuff.

So I'd like to ask...
How do you & your wife feel, after accomplishing what you both did, seeing the bar lowered, allowing persons who perhaps don't have the mental wherewithal you both have, to attain the same degrees your wife, (And, I'm assuming yourself), have?
My wife and I are in our early 40's. My wife's parents did not go to university. My parents graduated university (father has his masters degree). My dad is/was (retired) very successful, and I did not grow up wanting for anything I needed. I was lucky, my wife, not so much. We met at Baylor University our freshman year, where she was on financial aid, and my parents paid for my tuition. So, I am not a good example, and never include myself in what I am about to say.

"Lowering the standards" or "Affirmative Action" is a necessity, since elementary/middle/high schools are not equal. For example, the school district where my house is, is not as good as the school district of houses 6 houses down on my block. A student with a "B" average in that school district would have an easier time getting into the same school as someone with an "A" average in my school district. I'm not going to get into why this is the way it is, but I'm sure you can figure it out. Should these students have to work harder than those from the other school district just to get the same opportunities?

Every university has lower standards for legacy applicants or those that provide money to the school. For example, if we are lucky enough to have kids, our kid would simply have to graduate high school in order to get accepted to Baylor (because both parents are graduates of the school). While I was at Baylor, a large percentage of the student population were 2nd, 3rd, and one of my friends was a 5th generation Baylor family. I never hear an issue with this, but because an athlete gets in (and work their asses off, anyone who things being an NCAA DI athlete has it easy has no clue).


This has been the practice forever... But it seems to only be an issue when it is minorities that are given an opportunity to even slightly level the playing field. If you are from the public school system of Newark NJ, that has significantly older books, does not have enough computers for students, and does not have resources of other schools, are the students really getting the same education? Should graduates only be able to go to lesser universities because of their zip code? Since minorities are less likely to be legacy, should they not have something to attempt to level the playing field? Even if they work harder than their counterparts?

How is this any different than the business world? Jobs are more likely given by connections, be it nepotism, business connections, or what you can provide to the company.

Also, acceptance to a university means nothing. It is actually making it through to graduation and employment after that is the main metric of a university. There are a lot of late bloomers that once given an opportunity, will rise to the occasion. Universities will still kick out those that do not meet their minimum standards (be it financial or academic). Look at enrollment by year, freshman classes in a lot of schools are as big as sophomores-seniors combined.

Remember we are only 2-3 generations from Jim Crow Laws (1964/1965) my parents were 23, and Brown vs Board of Education (1954), my parents were 13. These are BIG issues that black Americans have had, that put them WAY behind the same starting point.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
I will answer this below.

I am a software engineer with a masters in Health Administration (essentially an MBA that has a healthcare operational focus). I do healthcare data analytics in healthcare quality. I specialize in managing, reporting, analyzing and presenting healthcare datasets.

My wife and I are in our early 40's. My wife's parents did not go to university. My parents graduated university (father has his masters degree). My dad is/was (retired) very successful, and I did not grow up wanting for anything I needed. I was lucky, my wife, not so much. We met at Baylor University our freshman year, where she was on financial aid, and my parents paid for my tuition. So, I am not a good example, and never include myself in what I am about to say.

"Lowering the standards" or "Affirmative Action" is a necessity, since elementary/middle/high schools are not equal. For example, the school district where my house is, is not as good as the school district of houses 6 houses down on my block. A student with a "B" average in that school district would have an easier time getting into the same school as someone with an "A" average in my school district. I'm not going to get into why this is the way it is, but I'm sure you can figure it out. Should these students have to work harder than those from the other school district just to get the same opportunities?

I'm very familiar with that. Due to reasons I wont go into, as a child we moved a lot so I went to school in several different areas. One place we moved, I had to repeat the grade I'd just finished.

In 1972 my parents bought a house in a different town, and my youngest sister had to repeat the grade she'd just finished. So apparently unequal education has been around for a long time.


Every university has lower standards for legacy applicants or those that provide money to the school. For example, if we are lucky enough to have kids, our kid would simply have to graduate high school in order to get accepted to Baylor (because both parents are graduates of the school). While I was at Baylor, a large percentage of the student population were 2nd, 3rd, and one of my friends was a 5th generation Baylor family. I never hear an issue with this, but because an athlete gets in (and work their asses off, anyone who things being an NCAA DI athlete has it easy has no clue).


I wasn't aware of how Legacy applications worked.

This has been the practice forever... But it seems to only be an issue when it is minorities that are given an opportunity to even slightly level the playing field.

Could that be because only minorities benefit from A-A? Are you aware of any programs that benefit non-minorities in the same way? How about the non-minority kids in the poor school. How do they get their shot at a college education?

If you are from the public school system of Newark NJ, that has significantly older books, does not have enough computers for students, and does not have resources of other schools, are the students really getting the same education? Should graduates only be able to go to lesser universities because of their zip code? Since minorities are less likely to be legacy, should they not have something to attempt to level the playing field? Even if they work harder than their counterparts?

I understand what you're saying, and I believe anyone who wants a college education should have the opportunity to get one.

That being said, what benefit does a person get from college if they can't keep up
with their classmates and get left behind? I sat in on a class my niece was taking at Springfield College. (She now holds a Doctorate in Sports Medicine).
That class moved right along, (She said they were all like that).
The teacher would answer a students question, then move on.

I've read articles pertaining to the minority drop out rate in college. Many stated that the student might have done better in a Community College setting, where classes were more, laid back, so to speak.


How is this any different than the business world? Jobs are more likely given by connections, be it nepotism, business connections, or what you can provide to the company.

I can't speak to that, being I never worked in a business environment.
Friends that have confirm what you are saying.


Also, acceptance to a university means nothing. It is actually making it through to graduation and employment after that is the main metric of a university.

That is true. Minorities are being recruited so the college can show how diverse it is.

There are a lot of late bloomers that once given an opportunity, will rise to the occasion. Universities will still kick out those that do not meet their minimum standards (be it financial or academic).

That's my point! People who are admitted on the basis of color, who are not qualified, either quit, or get booted out. (Question. Would a Legacy admission who was not qualified, or failed to meet the minimum requirements also get the boot?)

Look at enrollment by year, freshman classes in a lot of schools are as big as sophomores-seniors combined.

Remember we are only 2-3 generations from Jim Crow Laws (1964/1965) my parents were 23, and Brown vs Board of Education (1954), my parents were 13. These are BIG issues that black Americans have had, that put them WAY behind the same starting point.
Click Above ⏏

So, what, in your opinion, can be done to equalize education?

I've read that DC spends more per student than anywhere else, yet their scores are near or at the bottom.

Here in Connecticut, I've read articles about teachers buying their own supplies to supplement what the school gives them. We're supposedly one of the wealthiest states in the country, why isn't there enough money to properly educated our children?

Something has to change.

Edit To Add
It wasn't until I finished my 2 finger typing, that I figured out how I should have formatted my response.
 
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So, what, in your opinion, can be done to equalize education?

I've read that DC spends more per student than anywhere else, yet their scores are near or at the bottom.

Here in Connecticut, I've read articles about teachers buying their own supplies to supplement what the school gives them. We're supposedly one of the wealthiest states in the country, why isn't there enough money to properly educated our children?

Something has to change.
I don't have the answer. But understanding there is an issue should at least make people understand that a stopgap is to lower the standards in order to give opportunity that would never be there for those who are actually working just as hard, if not harder.

The common argument (this thread is a perfect example) is that they are simply lowering the standards to let idiots in... Look to the use of Ebonics and bringing up the basketball team (which were never part of this shift in standards). This is never the case, they slightly lower the standards to bring in a more diverse student population.

If admissions were simply academics, universities would only be filled students that went to expensive private schools, and top public schools in the country. How would students get a well rounded education if all their classmates only came from money? How would an A student from an underprivileged high school get into a top university? This same student may/may not have an A average if they went to a top private high school, but how would we know? Should they have less opportunity because of where they were born? In reality, this is an everyday thing...
 
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