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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
About 5 years ago I bought my first motorcycle. I didn't know how to ride, didn't know how much to pay, didn't realize how silly I looked on a 600cc, etc.

I had the dealer deliver it to my apartment complex and just hopped on and wobbled down the parking lot until I got comfortable enough to hit the side streets.

I saw someone's tag line here which read "Those who are self-taught have idiots for teachers."

I don't disagree. But four years later I still had not wrecked or even dropped either the 600 Shadow or the 1100 ACE I bought a year after. Then I messed up and sold my ACE for a sports car. I'm back to my senses now.

Anyone self taught with similar luck? Should I still go take a riding course?
 

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everyone is going to tell you to take the msf class. they do show you a lot of good things. i took it when i was 17 and still practice a lot of the things they taught me.
 

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There's always something new to learn, I'd say why not go to the class? They are a lot of fun anyway...get a friend to go with you. If nothing else, it should help lower your insurance for a while.
 

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I self taught on an what was called and "Enduro" (street legal dirt bike) when I was 11 years old. I rode off road for 7 years and then took the MSF course when I wanted to ride on the road. I take it every few years now just as a refresher. Do take it, what you learn could save your own life. 8)
 

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self taught

Well others might disagree, you know what they say about opinions, but I grew up riding and am self taught. Yes I took some spills as a kid and learned some very valuable lessons from it. Not claiming to know everything but I don't see the need for any further training for myself. For someone learning at a later age, yes definately I would recommend strongly taking a beginner course to teach you the ropes. JMHO :wink:
 

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My Dad pulled my new Honda 100 out of the pick up truck when i was eleven. Then gave me one of his usual father son pep talks.
"I don't know sh!t about em son, but i figure after you fall down a few times you'll get the swing of it guess.........make sure you tell your mom i rode around on it with you." "And try to look out for cars and stuff.."


After that he gave me the manual and went back into the dairybarn to milk.....lol After about a week of wheelies from take off and dying trying to take off in 2nd or whatever i was fine.

Does that qualify for self taught? :roll:
 

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Re: self taught

trueblueXrider said:
Well others might disagree, you know what they say about opinions, but I grew up riding and am self taught. Yes I took some spills as a kid and learned some very valuable lessons from it. Not claiming to know everything but I don't see the need for any further training for myself. For someone learning at a later age, yes definately I would recommend strongly taking a beginner course to teach you the ropes. JMHO :wink:
I would kindly disagree. I was taught the basics by my father on a CL100 when I was 10. after that I learned a lot on my own. In the last 28 years I have never been without a bike and usually had 2 (street and dirt) I have ridden thousands of miles around town, across the country, raced 1/4 mi. motocross, enduro's and even an indoor "extreme" motocross (whatever that is). With this experience you would think I too would not need additional training. But, a friend who is the advanced rider course instructor filled me in on a few things I didn't know. So, you are never too old, too experienced, too lucky, or too good to not benefit from more training.
 

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I started out with my grandpa and dad teaching me. The only advice they gave was, "If you're going to crash or lay it down, look for some where soft to land."
 

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iuhoosier1992 said:
I started out with my grandpa and dad teaching me. The only advice they gave was, "If you're going to crash or lay it down, look for some where soft to land."
Always good advise!!! A nice lawn is far softer than a chrome bumper!!
 

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IMPO MSF BRC and ERC teaches and re-enforces survival skills.
along with basics on how to operate and manuver a motorcycle.

What MSF teaches should be taught in a Car Driving program
to new drivers and drivers that are up in age wanting to still
drive, along with other habitual offenders that drive a car.
and the list can be added too as well.

face it folks there are folks on the road that don't know how to drive.
I want to reduce my chances of being a statistic, I'll take and re-take MSF courses every year, State Provided at $80.00 and a 8 hr period of a single season, MSF BRC and ERC worth the price of admission.

My Dad always told me you will never be to old to learn..

my $0.02

Roger
 

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I've always thought that it was worth my time and money to buy and read a 500-page book if I got one good idea from it or was just reminded of something I had known but forgotten. I look at a rider safety course the same way. If I pick up just one thing that helps me or am just reminded of something I knew but had forgotten, it's well worth the time and money. :)

Beside, the one thing you can be guaranteed is that it's not going to hurt you at all. :wink: :) :D 8)
 

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You'll never regret taking the course. But your family may live to regret you not taking it. No one should let pride or arrogance stop them from doing something that could save your life. Remember, you owe it to your FAMILY to do everything in your power to be there for them for a long time. It's not about how good you can ride, but how good you can defend yourself against those you can't. THAT'S what you'll learn at the MSF.
 

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Don't you guys over there have any kind of test you are required to do by law before you ride on the highway?
Here in England you are required by law to take a Compulsory Basic Training (CBT) course before you are permitted to ride any motorcycle on a public highway. This consists of classroom and practical training leading to several hours with a tutor on the highway. There is also the driving test to pass which is now in two parts, first part theory and second part on the road with an examiner. If you take the test on a 125cc or less you are restricted as to the size of bike you can ride for the next two years. However, if you take the test on a 500cc machine (direct access) you are not restricted at all.
I have been around motorcycles since I was seven years old, I'm self taught, but only last year did I decide to take the test and buy a road bike. When I told the instructor I was an experienced trials rider he shuddered!! He said you're probably the best, most controlled rider here BUT, not on the road. Turned out he was right, apparantly one fingered brake and clutch control is unacceptable as are broadside skids during emergency stopping proceedures :D Many valueable lessons were learned during my training course and I was surprised just how many extra things you have to consider when you're riding as opposed to driving a car.
I'd recommend some tutoring to anyone.
 

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Has anyone who's taken the MSF course (either old timer who's ridden forever or newbie out of the box) ever left the place saying...."Man, that was a waste of my time"? I've never seen it happen. Maybe it has, but even most old hands who've got 35+ years of experience under their belt will tell ya that this is worthwhile. Just do it....like Spike said...it may save your life someday.

BTW - in case anyone didn't realize it, HRC (Honda Riders Club) reimburses up to $75 in rider training PER YEAR. I've taken both the Basic and the Experienced rider courses and it hasn't cost me a dime. WITHOUT A DOUBT - I am a much better rider today because of this training.
 

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crazy

Myfirst ride was on a mini bike, straight into the neighbors parked car,age 6 my dad had to pay for the damage to the guys car and gave my mini bike to guys kid at my mothers insistance. 1 yr. later he bought me an xr 75 when he and mom got divorced, just to pi$$ her off, I had to keep it at a freinds for 2 yrs. after that. Next bike was a TM 125 motocross which my mother also never knew about. I raced motocross till I was 18 and she never knew I had owned 4 different bikes. Blamed all bumps bruises and scrapes on football, which for some strange reason was ok. Crazy
Bryan
 
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started out on a xr75, then moved up to a bigger bulltaco...only thing the MSF course taught me was that i was not to old to learn some pretty nifty tricks to make my riding easier and safer.

have not taken the advanced class, but i feel very comfortable after riding for many years now.
 

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Doctor X said:
Don't you guys over there have any kind of test you are required to do by law before you ride on the highway?
Unfortunately, No. And it shows when you watch people ride. I got my license while in Australia, which also has compulsory rider training for ALL people wanting a license. I was so impressed by the training that I insisted that my wife take it regardless of whether she'd ever ride her own because I knew that level of instruction wasn't easily accessible in the US. She now has her own bike. Because of my training I can take my 800 pound beast and do a U-turn in a two lane road with no shoulders while never taking my feet off the pegs. People that haven't been trained typically don't have that kind of control of their bike.

In AU, there are also size restrictions on bikes. It's a power to weight ratio. Basically, it rules out anything over 250cc on sports bikes for the first 2-3 years you have a license regardless of age. On a cruiser (heavier) you can go up to about 1500cc. Not sure on the VTX1800 because it wasn't out yet when I left. That keeps the 20yr old children off of the 200+mph Busas... :roll:
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Good responses, guys. Thanks.

As soon as I work a deal, I'll be looking for a course.
 

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i self taught myself on a 1100cc bike. didn't have the money for msf or a starter bike back then. i think the msf course is a good idea though.
 
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