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Here's a list of the part numbers from HD to plug the holes where the factory gauges go, speaker covers/grilles, side seals, and glove box.

If you'll notice at the end of the part numbers is a 96. I ordered these for a 96 model so I'm sure you could also have them look up 97,98, etc. etc.

Speaker grill/covers. You'll need 2

77046-96A

Gauge plugs. These are for the 4 smaller gauge holes. Harley list 2 different kinds but one of them has a hole in the middle for the police to install a toggle switch. I did not order those. These are a solid piece and you'll need 4 if you're not using any gauges.

75106-96A

Side gaskets. These are the two rubber seals that go along the side of the inner fairing. You'll need 2.

58311-96

Nut extensions. The fairing has one bolt hole on each side that are down lower on each side, these two holes join the inner and outer together with a bolt. These extension screw into the outer fairing and act like a spacer when the inner and outer are joined. You'll need 2

58311-96

If you're not using a stereo harley makes a glove box to fit in the stereo hole.

76286-96

Windshield mounting tape/seal/gasket. This is a rubber gasket type of material that sticks to the outer fairing along where ther windshield mounts.

58247-96

As for the speedo and tach holes I'm using a leather tool bag used to mount on a windshield to cover those holes.

I haven't taken pics of this stuff yet but I'm about to take the fairing apart and I'll take pics then.

Hope this helps some who are planning on doing this mod.
 

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My 2 cents worth here. 95 and older is very different. I wouldn't use them years, hard to find parts cheap. The "96" means first year made. My 2003 batwing used all of "96" parts. 98% of "96" will work. Minor changes in the years to 2009. The small openings are a standard 2 in gauge hole. Use ebay and search and look at the slight diff in those pics they show, You may not see it tho. Harley recently went to throttle by wire, no cables, so they eliminated a hole on the lower right side. No big deal, still the same basic item. Scan all the tourer harley's out there and visualy record it. The pics attached will show the raw openings, glove box, glove box with radio peaking out. ( I made a cover to protect the electronics) Ebay guy called 'bikersdelight" has shields for $35.00, Harleys are $110.00. Marang, add those pics in detail on attachment locations, I haven't any yet.
 

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The C model speedo fits perfectly into the speedo hole in the Harley inner fairing. All I did was fab a bracket to hold it tight in the hole, put a bit of silicone around it and pushed it in. Looks great. Had to do some fab work to make a donut to put a 2.5 inch tach in the other hole. Harley sells a chrome gauge trim bezel (made in Taiwan) that dressed it right up.
 

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GPS Mounts, Fairings, &Electronics

I was looking for a (1") handlebar mount that I could use on a lot of things , like a camera , adding a switchbox, a gps, a tachometer
or just about anything you could think of that you would want on your bars. well there was not a single mount that is made to do all that , mater of fact each item had its own mount you could by for $40.00 to $60.00 , ouch .
ON with the hunt , you see i am an avid hunter and was a gunsmith, so why not use 1" scope rings around the handlebars and the bases as the mount bracket to whatever you want to mount. they are good looking , cheap $6.00 for two rings and $5.00 for two bases and if you look on ebay you might find them cheaper, and best of all they are universal, you can mount anything on your bars and it looks good.


I like the weaver mounts (cheap and very strong)




Drill 1/4" hole in the base




(NOTE: i like to use stainless steel bolts these are license plate bolts from wal=mart 4 for 1.87 w/ nuts)

Grind the head of a 1/4" bolt to make it flatter and two side to fit in the channel of the base. make sure that the top of the head of the bolt is below the top or the mount flats and doesn't block the notches of the base as this will keep the rings from seating . now a flat washer and nut and tighten .





screw the bracket to the bottom of your cam (tach.. whatever) add washers to make it 90 degrees from the way you want it to face .




your rings came with an allen wrench so take out the screws and mount the rings to the handlebars where you want it and tighten the ring to the bars then loosen the big slotted nut on the ring and place the base/bracket and tighten the slotted nut. now adjust the rings with the allen wrench to get the view you want or where you want it.




In the picture below if you look close near the left clutch bracket you will see a mount painted with chrome paint and a switchbox for my aug. lights.




ride safe:grin:
Horse
 

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Ok, The air temp gauge, still working on connections, volt is very simple hook-up. Cig lighter installed and speakers are 5 1/4, no spacers needed. I had an internal antenna, worked fine, but now I have a fender mount antenna for best reception. HD offer's speaker adaptors, your choice to use them. Click on my name and look at my profile pictures.
 

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Mini USB Cover

I opted to run a mini-USB cable to power my GPS instead of mounting a Powerlet or cigarette lighter.

When not in use, I needed to find something to cover the plug end of the cable to keep it clean and dry.

A 1/4 inch plastic bolt cap from the local hardware store did the trick. It was luck that the size I needed came in black.

It's not rocket science...........it's C.R.A.P.






 

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So did you cut the usb end off and run it directly to your battery or something?
I bought a cable online that had the mini USB at one end and bare wires at the other. It had an inline fuse and voltage converter which drops the voltage down to I believe 5 volts. In a standard cigarette lighter cable, I believe the voltage converter is built into the lighter.

As to my connection, I have a line to my battery for my trickle charger. I used the ring connectors to the batterry terminals and tuck the line in my toolbox behind the left cover. So, this allows me to hook up the battery tender or draw power from the battery.

Since the tender came with an additional cable with battery clamps, I cut the line to remove the clamps and kept the SAE connector end. I spliced the SAE connector to the bare wire end of the mini USB cable. Now I have a mini USB cable that I can plug into the line in my tool box that goes to the battery.

During riding season, the mini USB is plugged in at the tool box and in the winter I swap it out for the trickle charger connection.

I ran the line under the tank to the handle bars.

I'll go down and take a pic for you.

Here's a link to what I used. http://www.gpsgeek.com/products/gusb5v-b-direct-wire-12-30v-dc-hardwire-pigtail-cable-for-garmin-nuvi-gps-205-255-265t-550-750-755t-765t-785t-855-885t-880-magellan-1200-1212-1400-1412-1430
 

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So, you can see that I have one line that goes to the battery and one to the mini USB/GPS. If I had to have a cigarette lighter to run, say, a tire pump/compressor, phone charger or whatever; I keep one in the saddlebag that would simply plug into the battery line.

In 5 years, I've never had the need.

The direct mini USB line is clean. There are no larger cigarette lighter plugs or cables from them hanging out. The direct line is very clean.
 

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What also works well are vacuum line rubber plugs. You can buy an assortment for a couple of dollars at any auto parts store.
I cut mine in half(less than 1/2 inch) because they are usually too long.
When I pull it off to use the gps, I stick it on a nut of the right size on the bike and it will usually stay there until I need it again.
I have also used a sewing needle and threaded a piece of fishing line thru the cap end and then tied it the power cord, so this way it's always there when I remove it.
 

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I have a mini usb plug that I use to power my gps. It is run from my accessory fuse panel up the frame spine, under the tank, and in the handle bar cables. Never thought about a cover for the plug end. When not in use, I keep the end stored inside my windshield bag. However, if the plug end is fragile, I will put a cover on it.
Thanks for the ideas guys.





 

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DIY Camera Mount

Well, I've been wanting to add a camera to my bike since I got it. I have a cheap high def camcorder that takes decent video so now I have to mount it. I googled to find out how others did it and saw several posts about taking a PVC Tee, cutting it in half and ultimately clamping it to your bars. Here's one of the posts I found:

http://www.knick-knack.com/howto/motorcycle/cheap-handlebar-camera-mount.html

Anyway, that looked okay so I headed to Lowes. While there, I generally look around to see if I can improve on the idea. While in the plumbing isle, I found a clamp called "Split Ring Hanger" and that was just what the doctor ordered!!!

Items needed for Handlebar Mount:

(1) 1" Split Ring Hanger
(1) 2" 1/4-20 Carriage Bolt
(1) 1/4-20 Nut
(1) 1/4-20 Bar Knob
(1) 1" Clear Tubing

Total cost: $6.79

Steps:
- Insert carrage bolt into hole in top of Split Ring Hanger
- Install and tighten nut onto carrage bolt
- Cut approx 1" piece of hose.
- Cut one side of hose to form a split
- Wrap hose around handlebar SPLIT SIDE DOWN
- Install Split Ring Hanger on top of hose
- Snug Split Ring Hanger so it will move with a bit of effort
- Install bar knob onto carriage bolt
- As if it were a tripod, install camera onto carriage bolt
- Tighten bar knob against camera to secure it
- Adjust direction of camera for desired view
- Tighten Split Ring Hanger so it will not move


That's it!!! Looks good and it's solid as a rock! I'm going to mount one to my highway bars too to get that low angle road shot. :)

I'll post some videos when the weather cooperates. Let me know what you think.


Ride safe!
 

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How I installed a Spy 5000m alarm system on my 1300S

I bought the Spy 5000m alarm system to deter anyone from messing with my new bike. The system came in a box with only a schematic diagram for instructions on how to hook it up. They recommended a professional should install it. The gauntlet was thrown and I decided to tackle this DIY. Now I have a VTX 1300S cruiser and all the u-tube videos were showing installations on sport bikes. So much for u-tube. It appeared the biggest problem was to find a location for all the components of the system. These consisted of the brain box, the sensor box, the siren and the LED arming light. I pulled off the seat to search for likely locations for the 2 boxes and siren. Not much room there but I forged ahead. When I opened the battery box, I discovered a void at the front of the box.
image.jpg
I was able to squeeze the brain box in there with the wiring harness sticking out through the tool storage space. One box down and one to go. I found there was enough space between the seat and the rear fender to mount the sensor box, two boxes down.
image.jpg
I discovered a space just big enough for the siren behind the tool box and zip tied it in place.
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The LED light I mounted in the speedometer shroud in the same location as the odometer reset button except on the right side.
image.jpg
All that was left was to hook up the electrical. Red to positive side of battery, black to negative side, other black grounded to frame. No problem! The two yellow wires needed to be hooked up to the turn signals to flash when the system arms and to locate your bike in the parking lot. Using the repair manual wiring diagram, I knew I was looking for an orange and a blue wire. I slit open the covering on the wiring harness passing by the battery compartment and voila, there was a blue wire and orange wire. Being an individual that tends to use suspenders and a belt, I inserted a pin through the insulation of each of the wires and tested them while operating the signal lights. Luck was with me and I stripped the wires and soldered the yellow wires in place.
image.jpg
Now all that was left were the pink, brown and blue wires coming from the brain box. Here is where u-tube videos helped. According to u-tube, these wires were for the remote start and remote kill. I for one have no use for a remote start and I really don't want the kill switch to activate in my pocket while I'm cruising at 65 down the highway so I pulled those three wires out of the harness and buttoned everything up. If you have any questions, feel free to PM me.
 

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Memphis Shade Windslhield Trim in 20 Minutes

Here's my version of how to trim a Memphis Windshield. My first attempt to do photos with step-by-step instructions. This takes about 20 to 30 minutes. I have already performed the mod but I am recreating the procedure.



Equipment list - Hand Sander with 150 grit, Hand Jig Saw with metal cutting blade (fine tooth), String, Marker, Pen or Pencil and Masking Tape.



Mark where you would like the height of the windshield to be. I prefer the mark to be just below my line of eyesight. I still get the wind protection but view does not get impeded by bugs or rain.




Place the masking tape across the front of the windshield.



Mark the tape where you had established the best height.



Get your pen or pencil and tie a loop in one end of the string. Put the loop around the point of the pen or pencil and place the pen into the center allen bolt head located on the support strap of the windshield.



Pull the string up to the designated height mark, then mark the string so you will know where the second loop must end.



Place the marker in the second loop and make contact to the mark.



Trace the line from one side of the windshield to the other.



Be sure to use a fine tooth blade on your saw.


Cut the windshield following the line you have made, the tape protects the windshield from the saw.



Sand down any rough edges and/or imperfections with the hand sander and 150 grit paper.

Congrats!! Now you are done.

If the pictures are not showing, bear with me... still new at this....
 

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View attachment 42933 View attachment 42934 A couple of shots of my modified Memphis Fats 21" windshield after I trimmed the corners off so it would not contact the back of my light bar. I used a Dremel Rotary Tool with variable speed adjustment, Dremel router base attachment, and a #561 Dremel bit to make the cuts. I traced an unmodified edge onto a piece of 8 1/2"x11" card stock (Office Max or Office Depot) and then laid the pattern on a flat table and used my French curves and Ships curves that I used as a drafter to lay out the new contour. Anything with a round curve can be used, though. Once I was satisfied with what I had, I cut it out with scissors and proceeded to use blue painter's tape to cover the areas on the windshield being cut. I then used a very fine tip black Sharpie marker to trace the new outline onto the painter's tape on the windshield. I used a medium speed to begin cutting and proceeded slowly, making sure that the cutting speed was neither too fast so as to make it too easy to cut nor too slow as to require more force to push it where it needed to cut. Next, I wet sanded the edge with 3M #400 Wet or Dry black sandpaper to smooth and blend any unevenness of the contour and finished the final smoothness with a moist but not dripping Q-tip with Methyl Ethyl Ketone (M.E.K.).
NICE!!:thumbup: I may need to do this in the future!!! Thanks for the "how to" :D
 

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Windshield art instruction

I was asked to describe my method to do the windshield, so I thought I'd go ahead and put it into a how to so anyone can try their own.
You'll first need to know what you want on the shield, whether you want to have a custom graphic done at a graphics shop, your best bet would be to try to work out what design you want and get an idea on a flash drive before you go there, their time is valuable. My first one I worked with a truck window graphic and was able to carefully cut and paste it to where the edges were able to go under the hardware.
Either way you go, preparation is the key to having it work right. I clean the windshield thoroughly, I usually will use plain rubbing or denatured alcohol, avoid anything that can leave any kind of residue.
The next step is to determine how you want the front of the windshield to look, play with different locations with the main theme until you get it to what you want it to look like like. Then determine the center of the windshield, and the center of the graphic, peel back the backing to the half way point of the graphic and apply it to the windshield, it is usually pretty strong, but you want to lift and reposition as little as possible. Use either a soft squeegee, or the edge of you hand, holding the graphic out and smoothing from center to the edges, you will have to lift it most likely but keep the graphic as smooth as possible, the smoother it is, the less likely it will be to pull up in a wind, I've had all of mine up to 80 mph with none of them ever lifting. When the first side is as smooth as possible, start with the other side, also keeping it as smooth as possible while peeling the backing off. When you are happy with the results, you will want to have a very sharp utility knife and trim the graphic right on the edge of the windshield, try to make sure none will hang over the edge.
You can call that finished, and, it will hang on great, what I've done on a couple of mine is get some door edge trim at an auto parts store to put a "finishing touch" to the edge. They usually have either chrome or black, I've used both and it will all depend on the look you want. I've found that it will make this step go much easier, is to start pressing the edge molding on from the back of the windshield, so that it will come down over the edge of the graphic rather than pushing the edge of the graphic up. That will make more sense when you do it.
To get the windshield to thoroughly adhere, I usually let them set in the sun you may have to carefully warm it with a hairdryer on low setting, you don't want to bake it on just set the adhesive on the graphic.
That's what worked for me and I've done 9 windshields so far, and have 4 more to do, :yikes: :yikes: :yikes: :yikes:


Doc
 

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Someone has to say it, this thread is useless without pics :p
 
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