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Today I was listening to a talk radio show they were comparing staybilt to seafoam. He said the staybilt only sets up a protective layer on top of the gas and any time the gas is moved around it breaks the seal over the gas.
He said seafoam actually mixes with the gas and is a much better product.
My question is I have allready put in staybuilt in my tank. Now I wish I would have used seafoam. Do you think I could still add seafoam to the gas even with the staybilt allready in there?
 

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Yes you can. I have added both to my fuels with no ill effects.

But I wouldn't worry about Stabil not taking care of the fuel.

However, I do like Seafoam better, since it does more for the engine (cleaning it) as well as the fuel. More "bang" for your buck.

Make sure you take the bike out and run it, so that either of the fuel stabilizers can get into the carburetor, where the real damage could occur.

Kindest regards,

-Will
 

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I use Stabil in my two cycle engines and have had no problems. I prefer Seafoam but I wouldn't worry about changing.
 

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What causes gas to go bad is air, thus the reason to set up a floating layer on top of the fuel that is sitting like StaBil does. This is also the reason why you should keep the tank full during storage, but I also wouldn't change once one is added already.
 

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What causes gas to go bad is air, thus the reason to set up a floating layer on top of the fuel that is sitting like StaBil does. This is also the reason why you should keep the tank full during storage, but I also wouldn't change once one is added already.
staybilt vs seafoam? Store not, ride alot!:doorag:
 

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I've used seafoam to unstick some sticky floats on my older 90's bike, worked wonders. 1 ounce per gal, naaaaaaa, I went like 4 ounce per gal to "git er done" I swear by seafoam
 

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Moo BBQ will be along shortly to tell you how awful Seafoam is.



roy d...and we'll all get our weekly preaching:popcorn:
 

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I bought my Seafoam at Wally World for around $6-7 for the can when I think everyone was saying it was costing around $8 or $9.
 

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I've been a huge fan of Spectro stuff since the early '70's

FC Premium Fuel Conditioner & Stabilizer.
Formulated specifically for use in high-performance motorcycle and other small to mid-size high output engines, Spectro FC Premium helps you ensure top performance and easier maintenance from season to season. It is suitable for all forms of gasoline-fueled engines, from everyday lawn equipment to superbikes. It fights corrosion and varnish build-up, and counters ethanol-accelerated corrosive problems within your fuel delivery system. Inhibits corrosion and provides lubricity. prevents the formation of fuel-related gums and varnishes for easy starting after storage.
 

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I agree, but I do use Seafoam as sort of preventive measure, use a little every 2nd to 3rd tank just to keep things running smooth.
I just have to say hello to anyone from Milan. I lived there from 92 to 94. Great little town!
 

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I use seafoam in all my small engines that sit for a while and they always start the first couple of pulls or spins of the motor. I also add to my bikes in the off season.
 

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Moo BBQ will be along shortly to tell you how awful Seafoam is.



roy d...and we'll all get our weekly preaching:popcorn:
+1. It is left over refinery waste, if I remember correctly.
 

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Today I was listening to a talk radio show they were comparing staybilt to seafoam. He said the staybilt only sets up a protective layer on top of the gas and any time the gas is moved around it breaks the seal over the gas.
He said seafoam actually mixes with the gas and is a much better product.
My question is I have allready put in staybuilt in my tank. Now I wish I would have used seafoam. Do you think I could still add seafoam to the gas even with the staybilt allready in there?
I had Stabil in my Generator gas tank for 2 months and the gas went bad. It looks like I'll be moving over to Seafoam when I finally park my bike for any length of time.
 

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+1. It is left over refinery waste, if I remember correctly.
One man's garbage is another man's treasure. I have read all the arguments against Seafoam and none are objective. Most fall short of scientific while none site any negative field experience. I have used Seafoam for years and have recommended it after first hand experiencing it work while having no negative field experience.
Alcohol is the only harmful ingredient due to it's damaging effect on plastic and rubber parts. Both are found in fuel and intake systems. The pale oil keeps the alcohol from drying out the plastic and rubber parts which also would be hard for it to do in such a small concentration. In combination with the pale oil it will desolve much of the fuel varnish left on jets and needles and at the bottom of float bowls while carrying away water contamination and allow it to be burned in the combustion chamber.
While the argument that water treatments clean valves is true it is also a dangerous treatment resulting in hydraulic damage if too much water is induced. So keeping the water in suspension with a burnable fuel will promote cleaning while avoiding hydraulic damage. This is exactly what Seafoam does while allowing you to vary the concentration to suit the condition of the fuel/carb/intake at hand. It is in no way a cure all product or the best product for every problem, but with some 12 years experience with it personally, I have seen it work well many times while not having to worry about it harming any parts.
Yes it was invented for 2 cycle engines. The high amount of pale oil keeps 2 cycle engines lubricated and prevents damage. 4 cycle engines don't need so much pale oil so mixing it at about 1 oz. per gallon will render a useful solution. Mixing at higher concentrations of 4oz to a gallon is for bikes with gummed up carbs that are not running well to begin with. At this high concentration the bike will run rough and emit a light gray smoke. Not a road worthy solution but one that will clean out many carburetors. I have seen this happen on one turbo bike brought to one of our carb clinics for tuning. During tuning I noticed that the #1 cylinder plug was firing but not burning fuel. Reason being that no fuel was making it through the idle circuit. A high concentration was introduced and left in the carb for the day. During the evening ride when I had finished tuning all the bikes the turbo started running on all cylinders. Seafoam had loosened the varnish that was clogging the pilot jet. What works, works.
 

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I've also heard about a product called Startron, which is becoming popular in the boating community due to the Ethanol blends in gas now. It is supposed to prevent phase separation due to water/moisture coming in contact with the gas by scattering the water instead of letting it sink to the bottom. What happens is that ethanol will attract water, and cause it to separate out to the bottom. Since the ethanol is a primary oxygenator now, this can drop the octane dramatically causing problems.

Part of what I do for work involves dealing with underground storage tanks, where this is an issue that has to be constantly monitored. It only takes 0.5% water by volume to cause phase separation in E-10 gasoline, which for big tanks can be as little 6 gallons of water in a 12,000 gallon tank. In our 5 gallon tank on the X that would be about 6 tablespoons of water.

In reality though, the water would have to be directly introduced to the tank via a vent or other, such as could happen in a boat. Hence why it's a problem for boaters... humidity can do this too but you need kind of absurd conditions for it to happen... like filling the bike tank on a 100 degree day then having the temp DROP to almost freezing parked over night.

I guess what I'm trying to say is, don't leave the bike outside with the gas cap off when it's raining!
 
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