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Discussion Starter #1
I see this topic come up now and then so I figured I would snap some pictures of how I secure my bike when trailering.

I tie the bike down in 4 spots.
Always keep the kickstand up! to prevent a broken/bent kickstand or a hole in the floor of your trailer
Always have your bike in neutral. This keeps your transmission in good shape.

Never use a cam type (pictured below) strap to secure your bike. You'll never get it tight enough and they will come loose! They have a time and place and using them on your bike is the wrong place and time.


Behind picture of my bike strapped down



I like to loop the strap around the frame behind the side cover



Protect your pipes from the strap or they could scratch or buff your chrome.



Do your self a favor and go buy some soft tie straps from Walmart they are like 2-3 bucks for a pair of them. If you see them fray at all after some use throw them away. I wrap a towel around my lower fork and then put the soft tie around that then ratchet them down. Make sure you don't wrap up any wiring or brake lines when doing the front.



I only use ratchet style tie downs. Make sure you ratchet the center spool more then one revolution or the strap can loosen on you. If you have a open trailer I'll always close the ratchet and loop the extra strap around the ratchet so it won't open and the straps don't flap in the wind.



Make sure to check on your bike at every fuel stop :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I just picked up a bike in Louisiana, Bare helped load it for me and made a block for me. Once the bike was on my trainer, he grabbed the front brake as I slid a 4 stack of 2X6 under the frame. Doing this helps hold the bike up while strapping but more importantly it keeps the suspension DEcompressed so you are not wearing it out. With this method we were able to really crank my straps down since I was driving on some very rough roads and had no concerns about an 800 mile trip.
he has a write up on this:
http://tech.bareasschoppers.com/resources/handy-motorcycle-tools/#2xblocks
We tried that but found that the block would slide out from under the bike if it wasn't either screwed to the floor or had blocking on it to prevent it from slipping out from under the bike no matter how tight you cranked down on the straps, once it slides out then your left with slacked tie downs. We don't bother with blocks anymore...

Just got done with another 6000 miles of trouble free trailering :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Great post don't let the bastards get ya down.
nojoke

I do have a question, I'm trailering mine to a mechanic (250 miles) away, bike had a bad wobble so I can't ride it. I use soft straps on handle bars., My concerned is how much I compress the springs is that hard on them?? Son and I was wondering.
nojoke
I would avoid strapping down your bike from the bars (I've seen people bend the bars in the past) You really can't get much stronger point then putting your soft strap around the fork tube just above the lower tripple tree (make sure to not trap any brake lines or electrical). We usually strap them down compressing about 1/2 - 2/3 the fork travel (depending on the fork spring tension) and have never had a fork seal blow out (its really a feel thing basically you want it tight enough to not flop around and loosen up but not too tight).
 

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Back to

Back to blocks, if like me you would rather be safe than sorry, you build them to be a snug fit under the bike. By this I mean they will not slide under the bike when it is held upright. You simply nail them together until you achieve the height of the bike then add maybe a 1/2" so when you load the bike you hold the front brake and pull back and up while you or a helper wiggle the block under the frame. You can do this with your foot but a helper is easier.
i have trailered in the past without doing this with zero issues but I know it is harder on the suspension.
 

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I use a Canyon Dancer...........

I have a wheel chock mounted permanently in the front of my covered trailer and then I use a Canyon Dancer. I have trailered any and all of my 4 bikes around the country in blizzards and what have you and have never had a lick of trouble? Just remember that you only are trying to keep the bike upright not jacked down into the trailer floor. If I put my Dancer on the bars and snug up the straps that thing isn't going anywhere. :D
 

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If you use a Canyon Dancer, make sure your bars are really mounted tightly. I use to anchor the bars until one trip when I discovered the Canyon Dancer had pulled so hard that the bars had twisted in the support clamps. Thank goodness the bars weren't bent. I quickly discarded that set up and now anchor with ratchet straps around the triple tree". I also use a front wheel chock, side straps anchored to the frame at the passenger foot pegs and a strap through and around the rear wheel to keep it from bouncing around.
 

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My Trailering Experience and Tips for Success

I trailered my VTX 1800R last weekend, 180 miles round trip. I built and used a wood block under the frame on the way up, and did not use it on the way back. Here's what I discovered -

With the block, the bike was more solidly attached to the trailer, not as much bouncing around. But I became concerned I was transferring too much stress to the frame, since the bike's suspension was not helping very much to mitigate the bumps, just the tires on the trailer.

Without the block on the way home, the bike was a bit more "active" on the trailer, but I think this is the way I'll do it in the future. I used six tie down straps...four on the front (2 on each side) and 2 on the back (1 on each side). The fronts were both attached to the fork just above the lower triple clamp, and terminated at slightly different points on the trailer (one in the front corner bottom, and one on the front corner of the trailer railing). This way it was very stable, and if one of the front straps failed, there was another on the same side to ensure the bike would remain upright.

I looped the hook in the rear over the chrome piece where it emerges from under the seat and runs along the side of the rear fender. It's bolted to the frame at that point, so it's very solid and you can compress the rear shocks a bit better from there.

I rented a U-Haul motorcycle trailer, $15 for 24 hours, it has a number that begins with "MT", and has a front wheel extended outcropping in the front of the trailer that helps keep the bike centered and stable. Yes, it's plenty long enough, but just to be sure, take a tape measure to the U-Haul yard and be sure you have the 8'7" you'll need to prevent the rear fender from preventing the ramp to close. And the ramp is great, just ride it on, and slowly roll it off backwards, feet down, using the front brake.

If this is the first time you've used a trailer for a bike this big, here's how to approach it. Bike on trailer, sitting on kickstand, so bike leaning left. Attach the first ratcheting tiedown to the right fork just above the lower triple tree and to the trailer, and tighten enough to lighten the load on the kickstand. Now attach the left side, leaving a bit of slack, so you can go back to the right tiedown and as the bike gets near straight up & down, the left tiedown now becomes tight. There, you have it standing up via the tiedowns, get them both tight, attach another set as insurance, now do the rear, and finally retract that kickstand. Will take you a good 20 minutes, but it'll be good to go.
 

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We tried that but found that the block would slide out from under the bike if it wasn't either screwed to the floor or had blocking on it to prevent it from slipping out from under the bike no matter how tight you cranked down on the straps, once it slides out then your left with slacked tie downs. We don't bother with blocks anymore...

Just got done with another 6000 miles of trouble free trailering :thumbup:
An easy way to handle a support under the frame. Build a box that extends 2" past the frame on both sides, measure frame center to center, use belt sander or wood rasp to make groves in box that match frame. Box won't move.
hauled my bike to Florida many times, without problem.
 

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Never in all the years of transporting Scoots - plus dealer environment transporting them everyday -
Strapped down compressed - no forks have ever blown -

It doesn't magically develop 40 psi compressed 2 inches.
Maybe a pound at best.
Scoots hit 100's of compressions deeper going down the road.
Bottom of tote bag is 4" above fender shows impact.

If oil leaks - it must have already been damaged before tying down-
Not in 30 years - no one has shown it to happen.

High tempered steel springs don't just go soft tied down.
Another fable - like the 1000lbs from HomeDepot left permanent 6"sag in pickup.

I don't allow Scoot to budge in any direction -
Front end is solid in Kondor - 4 plus straps.

Kept in gear - so no rolling when trailer is not level - untying straps.
No tranny action is possible anchored correct.
There's roughly 3-4" of free travel in gear. Never allowed to any.
If it can move at all - with gorilla tugging - it's not tied down yet.

Keep in mind - an 800lb Scoot will be 3000lbs in sudden impact.
Really a pain coming through headrests machII.
 

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Why not keep your suspension in play? Then when you hit a bump, the suspension does its job. I've used this on my 1300 and it worked great.
The Scoot can not move using gorilla moves on it - it will give in if needed in severe hit of bump unblocked.

The PDF is wrong - the bars could still rotate not secured in wheel chock to prevent it.
It would eventually crash on the trailer.
 

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I used a wheel chock when I did it, but the straps pull to both sides on the wheel, so even in the set up in the PDF, the front wheel should not be able to turn.


The Scoot can not move using gorilla moves on it - it will give in if needed in severe hit of bump unblocked.

The PDF is wrong - the bars could still rotate not secured in wheel chock to prevent it.
It would eventually crash on the trailer.
 

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Never in all the years of transporting Scoots - plus dealer environment transporting them everyday -
Strapped down compressed - no forks have ever blown -

It doesn't magically develop 40 psi compressed 2 inches.
Maybe a pound at best.
Scoots hit 100's of compressions deeper going down the road.
Bottom of tote bag is 4" above fender shows impact.

If oil leaks - it must have already been damaged before tying down-
Not in 30 years - no one has shown it to happen.

High tempered steel springs don't just go soft tied down.
Another fable - like the 1000lbs from HomeDepot left permanent 6"sag in pickup.

I don't allow Scoot to budge in any direction -
Front end is solid in Kondor - 4 plus straps.

Kept in gear - so no rolling when trailer is not level - untying straps.
No tranny action is possible anchored correct.
There's roughly 3-4" of free travel in gear. Never allowed to any.
If it can move at all - with gorilla tugging - it's not tied down yet.

Keep in mind - an 800lb Scoot will be 3000lbs in sudden impact.
Really a pain coming through headrests machII.

:agree: I always completely compress my forks on every bike I have owned. Never have had a seal blow out.
 

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:agree: I always completely compress my forks on every bike I have owned. Never have had a seal blow out.
With normal tie down straps with quick release - almost impossible to pull forks down more than 2" just jerking on Scoot & pulling on strap.

Now the rear secured - the Scoot can't be budged.

But you raise the risk factor - if front wheel mount is not used.
One strap coming loose would allow wheel to turn - causing entire load to come loose.
Youtube is full of rookie crap.
 

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Last weekend we trailered bike 500 miles to where son lives in Colorado. I used ratchet straps connected to the handlebars (using nylon loops). When we returned home I noticed about 4 or 5 oz of oil on the trailer floor under the left front fork. Left fork seal leaked. I am assuming fork seal is 'blown out'.

This was the first time I have used a trailer to haul the bike. I did have the suspension compressed. There was no problem on the trip out. The bike rode fine for the weekend, and there was no oil leakage. The seal must have blow on the return trip.

Is there a good reference on replacing fork seals? How big a job is it?

Is the bike still ride-able or is this going to cause a safety issue? (Can this repair wait until winter???)


 

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Last weekend we trailered bike 500 miles to where son lives in Colorado. I used ratchet straps connected to the handlebars (using nylon loops).


When we returned home I noticed about 4 or 5 oz of oil on the trailer floor under the left front fork. Left fork seal leaked.
I am assuming fork seal is 'blown out'.


This was the first time I have used a trailer to haul the bike. I did have the suspension compressed.
You don't indicate the rear being double strap anchored.
Poor idea choice & risk.

Tying it down with ratchet straps has little to do causing the leak -
You simply forced the fork seals - possibly down into hard varnish bug juice & dirt causing the actual leak winched down into it.

Loop straps don't need to be on the bars - that maybe a point too high-
Lower triple tree lower down provides a better angle - wider angle.

What about the front wheel - was it in a fixed mount? Or just up against the wall/rail of trailer.

This also is bad - induces the wrong angles from tying down too close to the front.
 

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Why you guys haulin your scoots?
Easy for you to ask... you live in Tenn!!! That's one of the places I haul mine to!

Let me put it to you this way... have you ever ridden from Atlanta to South Florida? Its about 600-700 miles of boring NOTHING!!! Flat, straight highways... and typically with lots of rain along the way too! But once you get north of Atlanta... it's riding country!

We trailer up to Tenn/NC (from South Florida) at least twice a year. It takes about 12 hours... we arrive in one day, fresh with all our stuff, ready to ride for the next 4 days! I don't enjoy highway riding at all. We leave our tow vehicle and trailer wherever we arrive to and start out from... and pick it back up at the end of the week.

That's why! :)
 
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