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Thanks for the reply. I think you're spot-on! Something has to me misaligned to cause my kind of tire
wear. But can you tell what you are referring to when you write " triple clamps " ? thanks
They are 8 bolts on thetwo pieces; upper lower bridge that hold the fork tubes. Then reset the axle per manual procedure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Too low. My $.02. Consensus is 38-40 + or - a lb. or 2 from there. Lower will 'feel' better for the ride but higher will get better longevity out of the tire. Your way will be lucky to get 3-5K out of a tire.
I got 20,000 miles from the last front tire at 33 psi pressure. It was a Pirelli brand tire. I live in SE Arizona. It gets hot here in the summer. The pavement really hot. I can only image the inside temp of the tire on a 165 mile ride at a static pressure of 38-40 psi, and how high the pressure would climb. I suppose I could ride at 38-40 psi in the winter, then back down the pressure for summer riding. Thanks for your input. regards, ed farmer
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
They are 8 bolts on thetwo pieces; upper lower bridge that hold the fork tubes. Then reset the axle per manual procedure.
OH. . . so you're suggesting I set the entire fork ( I assume setting both forts vertically so they are of equal length down at the wheel axial? ). Then reset the lower stems of the forks horizontally using the pinch bolts. By the way, Clymer's maintenance manual writes to apply forceful up and down movement on the handlebar to set the lower forks sections with the pinch bolts loosened. Do you know of a better way to set the lower fork sections? Thanks for you reply.
 

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I got 20,000 miles from the last front tire at 33 psi pressure. It was a Pirelli brand tire. I live in SE Arizona. It gets hot here in the summer. The pavement really hot. I can only image the inside temp of the tire on a 165 mile ride at a static pressure of 38-40 psi, and how high the pressure would climb. I suppose I could ride at 38-40 psi in the winter, then back down the pressure for summer riding. Thanks for your input. regards, ed farmer
Thanks for explaining your location, and I 100% agree that you will have higher temps on a hot road & climate. But the main point is you are not riding at the lower pressures, they do go up when you get them hot, just not starting out. I guess I speak from the experience and climate and hills of Pa. Most of this forum's readers who are not in the arid climate you are will concur with me. 20K is phenomenal, BTW.
 

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I got 20,000 miles from the last front tire at 33 psi pressure. It was a Pirelli brand tire. I live in SE Arizona. It gets hot here in the summer. The pavement really hot. I can only image the inside temp of the tire on a 165 mile ride at a static pressure of 38-40 psi, and how high the pressure would climb. I suppose I could ride at 38-40 psi in the winter, then back down the pressure for summer riding. Thanks for your input. regards, ed farmer
Don’t take offense, but your reasoning is very, very mistaken. You could not possibly be more wrong. A lower inflated tire (softer ride) flexes more, which is more friction. More friction is more heat. I guarantee that your 33 psig tire will be much hotter than my 40 psig tire after the same long hot ride, if carrying the same load.

By all means, make your own choices, but perhaps it would be best if you actually understood the physics involved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Thanks for explaining your location, and I 100% agree that you will have higher temps on a hot road & climate. But the main point is you are not riding at the lower pressures, they do go up when you get them hot, just not starting out. I guess I speak from the experience and climate and hills of Pa. Most of this forum's readers who are not in the arid climate you are will concur with me. 20K is phenomenal, BTW.
Well that was my point, Ranger4U. In the summer, when the roads are so hot you can fry an egg on them, I'd be real
hesitant to run the tires at 38 to 40 psi because the tire pressure at those temps would make me uncomfortable as far as safety. By the way, I do my own maintenance on the VTX, including changing the tires myself. I keep detailed maintenance logs, and this is what I discovered. The previous rear tire I changed out at 11, 500 miles. I replaced that tire at 33,462 miles, so . . . 33,462 - 11,500 = 21,962 miles on that tire. The current rear tire was installed at 33,462 miles, and I checked my odometer today, and I have 45,349 miles on the bike, so . . . 45,349 - 33,462 = 11,887 current miles on this tire. Looking at the tire, it looks like it can easily go another 10k miles to 15k miles, giving this tire a range of approximately 22k miles to 27k miles. The current front tire I replaced at 25,662 miles, so . . . 45,349 - 25,662 miles has this tire currently at 19,687 miles, and looking at the tire, it too looks like it could run another 10k miles giving it a range of approximately 25k miles. . . except. . . this tire has that weird excessive wear pattern on the left side of the tire, which will require me to replace it when i change out the steering head bearings. These mileages are with tires pressures of 33 psi front, 34 psi rear. As you indicated though, these pressures go up proportional to the heat given off of the road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Thanks for explaining your location, and I 100% agree that you will have higher temps on a hot road & climate. But the main point is you are not riding at the lower pressures, they do go up when you get them hot, just not starting out. I guess I speak from the experience and climate and hills of Pa. Most of this forum's readers who are not in the arid climate you are will concur with me. 20K is phenomenal, BTW.
I messed up the math on the front tire. It currently has 19,678 miles and looks like it could go another 10k miles, which would give it mileage of approximately 30k miles, not 25k miles. But again, because of the excessive wear on the left-hand side, it won't get to 30k miles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Don’t take offense, but your reasoning is very, very mistaken. You could not possibly be more wrong. A lower inflated tire (softer ride) flexes more, which is more friction. More friction is more heat. I guarantee that your 33 psig tire will be much hotter than my 40 psig tire after the same long hot ride, if carrying the same load.

By all means, make your own choices, but perhaps it would be best if you actually understood the physics involved.
With all due respect, I don't see these tires "flexing" all that much. I believe the heat transfer from the hot pavement to the tire is what causes the increased tire pressure during a long ride. But does it matter. . . here in SE Arizona, in the summer, I'd be reluctant to have 38 to 40 psi in a cold tire, then go for a long ride when one could fry an egg on the pavement. Flexing or heat transfer, or both, the tire pressure no doubt would get a lot higher than 40psi.
 

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I believe the heat transfer from the hot pavement to the tire is what causes the increased tire pressure during a long ride. But does it matter. . . here in SE Arizona, in the summer, I'd be reluctant to have 38 to 40 psi in a cold tire, then go for a long ride when one could fry an egg on the pavement. Flexing or heat transfer, or both, the tire pressure no doubt would get a lot higher than 40psi.
Heat transfer from the pavement is certainly part of it, and you get a bigger contact patch (and thus more heat transfer area) when running at lower pressures. So, added flex plus greater contact patch all equals added heat. The rubber on lower inflated tires will be much hotter than a tire that was more inflated to begin with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Heat transfer from the pavement is certainly part of it, and you get a bigger contact patch (and thus more heat transfer area) when running at lower pressures. So, added flex plus greater contact patch all equals added heat. The rubber on lower inflated tires will be much hotter than a tire that was more inflated to begin with.
Thank you . . . I appreciate your reply/inputs. regards, ed farmer
 

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With all due respect, I don't see these tires "flexing" all that much. I believe the heat transfer from the hot pavement to the tire is what causes the increased tire pressure during a long ride. But does it matter. . . here in SE Arizona, in the summer, I'd be reluctant to have 38 to 40 psi in a cold tire, then go for a long ride when one could fry an egg on the pavement. Flexing or heat transfer, or both, the tire pressure no doubt would get a lot higher than 40psi.
Tire rubber is black, black absorbs sun's heat. You are correct.
 
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